Pandemic Religion Digital Stories Fellowship

Call open: immediately until filled
Awards announced: June 2020
Expected activity period: June – December 2020

 

Lived Religion in the Digital Age, in partnership with the Pandemic Religion project at George Mason University, welcomes applications for a short-term Digital Stories Fellowship. The Digital Stories Fellow will work from the Pandemic Religion database to create, compose, and/or curate original material for the Digital Stories platform. The fellowship carries an award of up to $1,500.

Digital Stories prioritizes the study and practice of visual, aural, multimodal, and other embodied storytelling techniques, particularly as they are shaped, transformed, or confronted by digital life and cultures. Preferred contributions include visual essays, short documentaries, soundtracks or podcasts, data visualizations, digital exhibits, multimediated content, and short essays, among other possible modes of public scholarship. The Digital Stories fellow will have expertise in religion, theology, American studies, performance studies, visual studies, or related fields or professions and will contribute a series of original entries to the site during the funding period.

This fellowship is expected to begin immediately and be completed by December 31, 2020.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest (1-2 pages), current CV or resume, and brief writing or multimedia sample (links to digital content are encouraged).

Please submit fellowship application materials or general queries to LRDA Administrator Dr. Samantha Arten at livedreligion@slu.edu. Applicants may also apply through this form. Applications received by June 15 will receive full consideration.

In addition to this fellowship, Digital Stories welcomes contributions on a rolling basis. Please contact Digital Stories Editor, Dr. Adam Park (adam.park@slu.edu) for questions and submissions.

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Supported by the Henry Luce Foundation and Saint Louis University College of Arts and Sciences, Lived Religion in the Digital Age seeks to better understand religion in American public life through collaboration with members of local and dispersed communities representing diverse traditions, histories, and practices. Attending to sounds, sights, and space, as well as to teachings and texts, our research team, including research and teaching fellows, resident artists, and faculty across the disciplines, works to build a robust multisensory inventory of religion as it is lived and studied in the complex realities of modern life. Read

more about the Lived Religion in the Digital Age project at religioninplace.org.

Pandemic Religion: A Digital Archive, a project of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, documents the many ways that American religious communities have been challenged and reshaped by the COVID- 19 pandemic. Institutions and members of the public contribute items — narratives, photographs, videos, and the like — that are then displayed and curated at pandemicreligion.org.

Author: Fannie Bialek

Fannie Bialek is an Assistant Professor of Religion and Politics at the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University.

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