Call for Papers: Queer Political Theologies Special Issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies

Edited by Ricky Varghese (Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis), David K. Seitz (Harvey Mudd

College), and Fan Wu (University of Toronto)

The contested field of political theology asks after the seemingly persistent theological, religious, and metaphysical character of people’s affective investments in political institutions and forms of life, including putatively secular ones. Political theology attends to what remains, what lingers— perhaps transfigured or rescaled—at scenes of crisis, catastrophe, and change, in moments when forms of life undergo profound structural and spiritual transformation. This special issue emerges from our observation that political theology, queer theory, religious studies, and queer theology already share in a critical hesitation about the pretensions of the modern subject as secular, sovereign, disillusioned, and bereft of metaphysical attachments; and in a curiosity about the psychic, visceral, ontological, and affective character of subject formation. Our aim, then, is not merely to “queer” political theology—to make a set of queerly informed postulates out of theology—but also to ask what is already queer about the intersections and junctures of the political and the theological.

We invite work that shares our curiosity about how the queer as an ontological, ethico-political, historical, and materialist category worthy of exploration might in itself emerge from the meeting of the political and the theological. We welcome scholarship that approaches the political and the theological themselves as categories that are deeply invested in configurations of modernity, subjectivity, and ontology—work that asks after the queerness that inheres or festers in the relationships between modernity, subjectivity, and ontology, broadly conceived. Queer political theologies might investigate scenes of jointure and investiture between otherwise inchoate, abject, quivering, creaturely, or fleshy bodies and sacralising political orders or religious praxes that imbue them with significance.

We approach this work with a keen awareness of the fraught stakes of gathering together scholarship from multiple fields and trajectories (queer theory, political theology, queer theology, religious studies, and more) under the banner of “queer political theology” in particular. Indeed, distinct scholarly traditions, not all of them historically friendly to emancipatory ethical, political, and intellectual aims, have infected “political theology” quite differently. While European(ist) political theologies have focused on the psychical and spiritual consequences of the shift from monarchical sovereignty to biopolitical forms of popular sovereignty, Asian, Arab, Latinx, African, and other political theological traditions have sought to map out reconfigurations of sacred/profane bodies politic amidst and from scenes of empire, colonialisms, decolonization, and postcolonial nationalisms. What we hope the contributions to this special issue will share, then, is not a singular political theological tradition, nor an exclusive set of geographical coordinates, nor a unitary understanding of the queer, but a sustained attention to the spiritual, psychical, religious, political, and ontological torsion at the core of processes of subject formation.

Possible topics might include:

  •   Religious praxis, ritual, and the sacred in sexual cultures
  •   Queer bare life, queer creaturely life, queer flesh, queer sacrifice
  •   The melancholic place of political theology in queer theory, queer theology and religious studies
  •   The queer temporalities and spatialities of political theology
  •   Queer secularisms
  •   Queer theory and forms of theism and atheism
  •   Queer theology’s responses to ecology and the Anthropocene
  •   The end(s) of history and queer readings of eschatology
  •   Queer poetics of theological texts and religious traditions

    We are looking for abstracts (no longer than 500 words) for contributions to be considered for inclusion in this issue. Please also include a one-page CV. Please send any inquiries and submissions to glqqpt@gmail.com by Friday, February 1, 2019.

    GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies is a Duke University Press publication http://www.dukeupress.edu/glq

Call for Papers: “Beauvoir in Conversation,” a Special Issue of Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Call for Papers – Special Issue of SdBS

“Beauvoir in Conversation”

 

Simone de Beauvoir Studies is currently accepting submissions for its Fall Issue 2019 (Vol. 30, Issue 2), which will be oriented around the theme “Beauvoir in Conversation.” There are at least three relevant senses ofconversation at play in the essays featured in this special issue. First, it implicates engagement with those thinkers who were Beauvoir’s interlocutors in life or on the page, as well as those conversations that are waiting to happen with thinkers whose ideas and writings speak to Beauvoir’s in some regard. Second, the word invites new disciplinary and interdisciplinary engagements with Beauvoir’s oeuvre, including those that place her ideas in relation to fields such as anthropology, geography, religion, critical race theory, and transgender studies. Third, “Beauvoir in Conversation” explores how Beauvoir is talked about¾how her texts and ideas have been received historically, how her sex has influenced how she is heard, and the extent to which her influence extends into popular culture, art, and the spirit of people today. Articles are published in English or French. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis, but to guarantee consideration for publication in this special issue (Vol. 30, Issue 2) submissions must be received by March 1, 2019. To submit an article, please refer to Instructions for Authors and additional information found on the journal’s website: www.brill.com/sdbs.

CfP: Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle, Stonehill College

The Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle

Stonehill College

North Easton, MA

April 5-7, 2019

We seek submissions for papers on any aspect of Foucault’s work, as well as studies, critiques, and applications of Foucauldian thinking.

Paper submissions require an abstract of no more than 750 words. All submissions should be formatted as a “.doc” or “.docx” attachment, prepared for anonymous review, and sent via email to the attention of program committee chair Don Deere (dtdeere@gmail.com) on or before December 14, 2018Indicate “Foucault Circle submission” in the subject heading. Program decisions will be announced during the week of January 15, 2019.

In light of the recent publication of Les Aveux de la chair (The History of Sexuality IV), this year’s meeting will include a discussion session on Foucault’s complex engagement with Christianity (relevant English texts will be made available on our website).  The conference will begin with a Friday afternoon panel session and an evening reception.  Morning and afternoon paper sessions will be held on Saturday, followed by a business meeting and dinner. The conference will conclude with paper sessions on Sunday morning. Presenters will have approximately 40 minutes for paper presentation and discussion combined; papers should be a maximum of 3500 words (20-25 minutes reading time).

 

Logistical information about lodging, transportation, and other arrangements will be available after the program has been announced.

For more information about the Foucault Circle, please see our website: http://www.foucaultcircle.org

or contact our Coordinator, Ed McGushin: emcgushin@stonehill.edu

CfP: “Gender, Sexuality, and Judaism,” G’vanim, the Journal of the Academy for Jewish Religion

In the last few years issues of gender and sexuality have risen to the forefront of public attention. As such, AJR devotes our next volume of G’vavnim to the topic of “Gender, Sexuality, and Judaism.” Contributions may consider the topic from any historical period and from any rigorous methodology (both traditional and academic). To be considered for publication in this volume, abstracts for articles must be received by November 30, 2018. If approved, complete articles of 1500-5000 words in length will be due March 1, 2019. Authors are invited to submit abstracts of 250-500 words for potential articles to the current editor, Dr. Matthew Goldstone (mgoldstone@ajrsem.org) for review.

Submission Guidelines

G’vanim is an online journal published annually by the Academy for Jewish Religion (and indexed by EBSCO Publishing). G’vanim commissions and reviews unsolicited submissions for articles on topics related to the past, present, and future of Judaism. Articles that contribute to the Academy for Jewish Religion’s dedication to pluralism are especially welcome. Articles should not have been published previously and, while authors retain the rights to their contributions, acceptance for publication in G’vanim constitutes agreement not to republish submissions elsewhere for one year following the official date of publication of the relevant volume of G’vanim. Although G’vnaim is not officially a peer-review journal, all abstracts and full-length articles must be approved by the editor and/or editorial board as meeting the high standards for excellence in research and novelty of contribution prior to acceptance for publication.

About the Journal

Founded in 1956, the Academy for Jewish Religion (AJR) is the oldest pluralistic Jewish seminary in the United States. AJR is dedicated to ordaining rabbis and cantors for all Jewish communities and to sharing insights into Judaism and Jewish tradition with our expanded community. Accordingly, in 2005 faculty member Rabbi Bernard M. Zlotowitz (1925-2015) issued our first volume of G’vanim: The Journal of the Academy for Jewish Religion to “spread and disseminate more Jewish knowledge.” After publishing 9 volumes, publication of the journal was temporarily suspended while AJR devoted efforts to the publication of Studies in Judaism and Pluralism: Honoring the 60th Anniversary of the Academy for Jewish Religion, edited by adjunct faculty member Dr. Leonard Levin. It is with great excitement that we revive the journal as an online publication in order to fulfill our mission of serving the Jewish community and providing knowledge of Jews and Judaism to the general community.

CFP: #MeToo and Philosophy

CALL FOR PAPERS

The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy

Fall 2019 Issue: #MeToo and Philosophy

 The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy invites papers on the topic of #MeToo and Philosophy. In 2006 Tarana Burke, a Black feminist social activist and community organizer, founded the Me Too movement to focus on the experiences of abuse suffered by Black and brown girls and women who are and remain disproportionately vulnerable. More specifically, the goal of Me Too was to connect survivors of sexual assault to the resources they need in order to heal. More than a decade later, this movement became #MeToo, a hashtag used in social media to demonstrate the ubiquity of sexual assault and harassment, especially in the workplace. As Tarana Burke has recently said, “What #MeToo allowed people to do was create community with these shared experiences. You have a built-in group of people who automatically gets you, who automatically believes you, who automatically wants to hear you. That’s the wildfire of it.”

This movement continues to be foisted into national and international consciousness as more and more men are accused and charged of sexually harassing and abusing women. And yet the number of cases that go unreported, the number of women who remain silent are even larger, pointing to the systemic problems of injustice for victims of abuse, assault, and harassment and the systematic failures of our institutions to bring about justice. All of these problems are complicated by the class, race, nationality, immigration status, sexuality, gender identity, and disability of victims.

#MeToo is a crucial form of resistance and the #MeToo movement, in all of its complexity, is ripe for philosophical engagement and analysis.

The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy invites papers, book reviews, and narratives for the Fall 2019 issue that include, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • #MeToo and anger
  • #MeToo and shame
  • #MeToo and forgiveness
  • #MeToo and epistemic injustice
  • #MeToo and gaslighting
  • #MeToo and credibility
  • #MeToo and testimony
  • #MeToo and allies
  • Intersectional analyses of #MeToo movement
  • #MeToo and himpathy
  • #MeToo and misogyny
  • #MeToo and misogynoir
  • #MeToo and transmisogyny
  • #MeToo and justice
  • #MeToo and domestic violence
  • #MeToo and sex education
  • #MeToo and internet bullying
  • #MeToo and civility
  • #MeToo and the silencing of victims
  • #MeToo and academia
  • #MeToo in non-western countries and contexts
  • Trauma informed responses to #MeToo
  • #MeTooAfterKavanaugh
  • #WhyIDidn’tReport
  • The backlash of #HimToo

Invited papers by the following philosophers will appear in the issue:

  • Cassie Herbert (Illinois State University)
  • Alice MacLachlan (York University)
  • Lori Watson (University of San Diego)
  • Robin Zheng (Yale NUS-College)

SUBMISSION DETAILS

The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy welcomes three different types of submissions:

  1.  Papers: philosophical papers should be no longer than 7000 words (including references and footnotes).
  2.  Book reviews: The newsletter will publish reviews of books with feminist content. The length should be between 1500-2500 words. Review books need not be related to the topic of the special issue. Reviewers must have specific expertise on the subject of the text. The format of book reviews is as follows. They should begin with a brief description of the book as a whole, should contextualize the book within the relevant literature, and should develop a critical evaluation of at least some of the main themes and arguments. Evaluative comments should be specific, instructive, and respectful of diverse philosophical methods and voices.

If you are interested in reviewing a book for the Newsletter, please send a C.V. and a brief explanation of your particular interest in and qualifications for reviewing the chosen text to the following address: Lauren.Freeman [at] Louisville.edu. If you do not own the book, I will request a copy from the publisher. Deadlines for reviews are negotiable.

  1. Narrative essays: We also invite shorter narrative style essays of around 2500 words in length. These essays should be less formal than standard philosophical papers and can discuss issues and problems related to feminism that philosophers face within the academy, but also in our public and personal lives.

The format for all submissions to the Newsletter is available on the APA website: http://www.apaonline.org/?feminism_newsletter

Submissions should be prepared for anonymous review and must be submitted by March 31, 2019.

Send submissions to: Lauren.Freeman [at] Louisville.edu

Lauren Freeman

Editor, APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy

University of Louisville, Department of Philosophy

 

With thanks to FeministPhilosophers!

Job Opening: Assistant Professor, The John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, Washington University in St. Louis

The John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis invites applications at the rank of assistant professor, especially from candidates with an expertise on Islam in North America. The position will begin July 1, 2019. The search committee welcomes applications from scholars from a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to, Anthropology, Gender/Women Studies, History, Law, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Security Studies, Sociology, and Theology.

Candidates should possess a promising profile of scholarly publication on religion and politics in the United States with a focus on Islamic traditions in North America, other traditions in the U.S. beyond Christianity, or an area that significantly augments existing faculty strengths. Candidates should also have a record of effective teaching in a diverse campus community. A PhD, received no later than July 1, 2019, is required. Duties for the position will include undergraduate teaching, conducting and publishing research, and participating in Center governance and wider university service. We particularly welcome candidates with a demonstrated interest in writing for broader audiences and engaging the public beyond the university. Applications from women and members of underrepresented groups are especially encouraged. Washington University is an equal opportunity employer committed to affirmative action. To apply, send a letter of application, along with a curriculum vitae, to the following e-mail address: rap@wustl.edu. Three letters of recommendation should also be submitted, along with a scholarly writing sample. Nominations may be sent to the same address. The search committee will begin reviewing applications as early as December 1, 2018, and will continue doing so until the search is complete.

 

For more information, see http://rap.wustl.edu/faculty-search-announced/

 

Job Opportunity: Contemporary LatinX Studies Cluster Hire, Emory

Contemporary LatinX Studies Cluster Hires

 

Emory College of Arts and Sciences in Atlanta, Georgia announces a special initiative to recruit and support several tenure-track and tenured faculty (advanced assistant and/or associate/full professors) in the area of contemporary LatinX studies in the humanities and social sciences. Faculty whose research advances this emerging field of scholarship, who bring a demonstrated commitment to mentoring a diverse student body, and who are eager to contribute to the University’s ambitious goals of scholarly excellence, diversity and inclusivity, and interdisciplinarity are encouraged to apply.  This search will complement Emory’s growing distinction in the scholarship of race and the African American experience, recent faculty appointments in the departments of Spanish and Portuguese and Religion, our exceptional archival holdings and special collections in the Rose Library, partnerships with Atlanta-based institutions, and a commitment to interdisciplinary scholarship and collaboration.  Departments participating in this multi-field search include: African American Studies, Anthropology, Art History, Economics, English, Film and Media Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.  Research and teaching expertise including but not limited to the following fields are of particular interest: LatinX and Afro LatinX literature, art, and culture, philosophy, citizenship, race, gender, sexuality, religion, political economy of migration, labor, and health. All applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to teaching and mentoring a diverse student body. Candidates must hold a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline/field.

 

Review of applications will begin October 8, 2018.  Full consideration will be given to all applications received within 30 days.  Review will continue until positions are filled.  At this stage, we ask applicants to submit a cover letter, names and contact information of three references, and a CV.  Candidates’ cover letters should include a discussion of their experience and vision regarding the teaching and mentorship of students of diverse backgrounds.

 

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

 

Application Instructions:

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter and CV only during this phase of the recruitment using the following link:  https://apply.interfolio.com/56210
.  Candidates will be asked to submit additional supporting materials if selected to participate in future phases of recruitment.   Questions may be sent to: Carla Freeman, Senior Associate Dean of Faculty: Dean_of_Faculty@emory.edu