American Association of University Women American Fellowships

AAUW American Fellowships support women scholars who are completing dissertations, planning research leave from accredited institutions, or preparing research for publication. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Candidates are evaluated on the basis of scholarly excellence; quality and originality of project design; and active commitment to helping women and girls through service in their communities, professions, or fields of research.

Applications are open from August 1-November 1. More information about each opportunity (for different career stages) can be found here: https://www.aauw.org/what-we-do/educational-funding-and-awards/american-fellowships/

Harvard Women’s Studies in Religion: Research Associate and Visiting Faculty Positions, 2019-2020

HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL announces five full-time positions as Research Associate and Visiting Faculty for 2019-20 in its Women’s Studies in Religion Program.  Proposals for book-length research projects utilizing both religion and gender as central categories of analysis and focusing on any religion are welcomed.  Salary for 2019-20 will be $60,000.   Completed applications are due online by October 15, 2018.  Applicants must have received their PhD by October 1, 2018.  Please see our website (http://wsrp.hds.harvard.edu/apply) for more information.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor in Gender and Peace Studies, Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs invites applications for a tenure-track, assistant professor position in Gender and Peace Studies, based at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. The position will begin in August 2019; Ph.D. degree is required at the time of hire.

The disciplinary specialization for the position is open. Depending on the profile and interests of the successful candidate, the position could have an affiliation with another School or College at the University of Notre Dame.

The Keough School (http://keough.nd.edu), of which the Kroc Institute (http://Kroc.nd.edu ) is an integral part, is particularly interested in scholars who engage in questions of gender and intersectionality as they relate to challenges to peace and prospects for justice and social transformation. The successful applicant is expected to play a leading role in the Kroc Institute’s plans for developing a research and teaching focus on gender, intersectional enquiries, and peace theory and practice, as well as teach in the curricular programs of the Keough School.

The Keough School promotes interdisciplinary research in global affairs and encourages applications from scholars who engage in interdisciplinary research and teaching, and who work on the nexus between theory and practice.

The Kroc Institute is a leading center for the study of strategies for sustainable peace and the causes of violent conflict. Kroc Institute faculty conduct research on the conditions for peace, including the role of peace processes and the causes of war (from local and regional armed conflicts to large-scale international conflicts), as well as genocide, terrorism, ethnic and religious conflict, structural and cultural violence, and violations of human rights. The Kroc Institute offers an undergraduate program in peace studies, a Master’s concentration in peace studies as part of the Keough School’s Master in Global Affairs, and joint Ph.D. programs in Peace Studies with the Departments of Anthropology, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Theology.

All applicants are required to submit a letter of interest and a C.V., and should also arrange for the submission of three letters of reference.  Application materials should be submitted through the Interfolio/Notre Dame online application system: https://apply.interfolio.com/53933. Nominations and inquiries may be sent via email to:

Prof. Asher Kaufman

John M. Regan Jr. Director, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies

Chair, Gender and Peace Studies Search Committee

Keough School of Global Affairs

University of Notre Dame

akaufma2@nd.edu

Call for Abstracts: Humanistic Perspectives on Moral Injury Conference, April 2019, Georgia State

Call for Abstracts:
Humanistic Perspectives on Moral Injury, 11-12 April 2019.

The Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics announces a conference at Georgia State University about moral injury.

On many accounts, moral injury is a form of trauma one may have from participating in or witnessing an act that challenges deeply held values. There are reports of moral injury among members of the armed forces, medical practitioners, journalists, first responders, and others. This conference will feature original research by leading experts and scholars who will draw on the tools of the humanities to theorize moral injury.

We will feature presentations that explore the normative dimensions and implications of trauma for understandings of political authority, interpersonal accountability, civic duty, collective agency/responsibility, recovery from historic injustice, and related themes.

Featured speakers to include:

  •  Ed Barrett (Stockdale Center, United States Naval Academy)
  •   Saba Bazargan-Forward (Philosophy, UC San Diego)
  •   Rita Nakashima Brock (Volunteers of America)
  •   Neta C. Crawford (Political Science, Boston University)
  •   Joseph Galloway (journalist, columnist, and co-author of books such as We Were Soldiers Once… and Young)
  •   Linda Radzik (Philosophy, Texas A&M University)
  •   David Rodin (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict)
  •   Nancy Sherman (Philosophy, Georgetown University)

    To propose a paper, prepare the following:

  1. 1)  An email containing name(s), contact information for session speaker(s), and paper title.
  2. 2)  In a .pdf or MS Word attachment suitable for blind review, a title and 250-500 word abstract.

Please send to Lauren Michelle Cooper at lcooper14@gsu.edu by 6 November 2018 at 17:00 UTC. Submissions will be acknowledged promptly. Authors of proposals will be notified by 20 December 2018. Contact information: Andrew I. Cohen aicohen@gsu.edu

Book Series: Explorations in Contemporary Social-Political Philosophy, Rowman-Littlefield

As our world continues to be buffeted by extreme changes in society and politics, philosophers can help navigate these disruptions. Rowman and Littlefield’s ECSPP series books are intended for supplementary classroom use in intermediate to advanced college-level courses to introduce philosophy students and scholars in related fields to the latest research in social-political philosophy. This philosophical series will have multidisciplinary distribution and the potential to reach a broad audience of students, scholars, and general readers.

We seek concise student-oriented books written with philosophical insight and analysis but in accessible prose without jargon and with practical examples for multidisciplinary and general readers. The books should address and explore significant or controversial contemporary social-political questions and be suitable for a wide range of courses throughout the humanities (Philosophy, English and Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, Ethnic and Gender Studies, Justice Studies, Religious Studies, Communication, Journalism).

Prospective authors should send nmandziuk@rowman.com (Natalie Mandziuk, acquisitions editor), lshrage@fiu.edu, and nzack@uoregon.edu a brief query about your manuscript, prospectus, OR description of a manuscript in progress.

 

Editor(s): Naomi Zack and Laurie Shrage

 

More information: https://rowman.com/Action/SERIES/_/ECSPPRLG/Explorations-in-Contemporary-Social-Political-Philosophy#

Job Opening: Kyung-Chik Han Chair of Asian American Theology, Princeton Theological Seminar

Princeton Theological Seminary seeks a scholar to occupy the Kyung-Chik Han Chair of Asian American Theology. Applicants should be theologians (systematic, constructive, or historical) whose scholarship and teaching give critical attention to Asian American experience and ecclesial life. Other areas of specialization are open to negotiation. Candidates should be willing to contribute to the Asian American Program at PTS. Appointment at the level of associate or full professor will be made with tenure. Appointment at the level of assistant professor will be tenure track, but the appointee will only occupy the Han Chair upon successful completion of the Seminary’s tenure and promotion review process. Applicants are expected to have a portfolio of published research and teaching experience in the field and to hold a Ph.D. or its equivalent. The successful candidate will teach in all the Seminary’s masters’ and Ph.D. degree programs, pursue an active scholarly research agenda, and participate in the life of the Seminary. As Princeton Theological Seminary is related to the Presbyterian Church (USA), faculty members are expected to work constructively within an ecumenical ethos informed by the Reformed Tradition. The appointment is expected to commence July 1, 2019. Women and candidates from underrepresented communities are especially encouraged to apply.

Applicants should send (1) a letter of interest; (2) a CV (including bibliography); and (3) a list of three potential recommenders to academic.dean@ptsem.edu.

Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2018. Princeton Theological Seminary is an equal opportunity employer.

Hypatia Special Issue on Decolonial Feminisms

Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy seeks papers for a special issue (35: 3, Summer 2020) on decolonial feminisms, guest edited by Nancy Tuana and Emma Velez. There has been a great deal of work, from an array of diverse contexts and traditions, on the articulation of the “decolonial turn” in philosophy. Of particular importance to the articulation of decolonial theory has been the work from theorists emerging out of the Latin American and Latinx context. Engaged with, but seeking to differentiate their theory from the anticolonial work of postcolonial theory, decolonial philosophers have emphasized the importance of the still lingering structures of colonialism in power, ontology, and, the imposed logics of race and gender. This work has been at times influenced by, as well as developed in parallel to, decolonial philosophy from Africana and Caribbean philosophy as well as from indigenous philosophy. However, much more work is required to further the articulation of decolonial feminisms as an emergent methodological orientation to anticolonial theory and to trace both the specific contributions of Latin American and Latinx philosophy to the development of decolonial philosophy, as well as the intersecting lineages with other approaches to decolonial and/or post-colonial philosophy.

We welcome feminist scholarship on decolonial philosophy that traces lineages informed by Latin American/Latinx feminist philosophy. We encourage investigations of lines of influence, as well as points of convergence and divergence between Latin American/Latinx feminist decolonial thought and decolonial philosophical investigations from Africana and Caribbean philosophy as well as indigenous philosophy.

We invite submissions that take up feminist philosophy in relation to Latin American/Latinx approaches to decolonial philosophy. We welcome feminist approaches that compare Latin American/Latinx decolonial philosophical approaches to those emerging from Africana and Caribbean philosophy, as well as from indigenous philosophy. We are also interested in approaches that trace intersections as well as discontinuities between decolonial and postcolonial feminisms. We welcome papers that focus on specific decolonial philosophers or compare within or across decolonial traditions. We are also interested in papers that offer theoretical and/or practical feminist decolonial investigations of gender, race, rationality, sexuality, and modernity.

Topics to consider may include, but are not limited to:

Latinx and feminist engagements with decolonial philosophy
Decolonial engagements with feminist philosophy
Women, gender, and sexuality in Non-Western contexts
Challenges to Western conceptions of the categories of woman, gender, and sexuality
Feminist decolonial praxis
Genealogies of decolonial thinking in Latin American/Latinx feminist philosophy
Latin American/Latinx lineages in decolonial philosophy
Intersectionality and decolonial philosophy
Discontinuities between decolonial philosophy and feminist philosophy
Decolonial conceptions of feminist pedagogy
Intersecting lineages
Submission deadline: December 1, 2018

Papers should be no more than 8000 words, inclusive of notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, and accompanied by an abstract of no more than 200 words. In addition to articles, we invite submissions for our Musings section. These should not exceed 3,000 words, including footnotes and references. All submissions will be subject to external review. For details please see Hypatia’s submission guidelines.

Please submit your paper to: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/hypa. When you submit, make sure to select “Toward Decolonial Feminisms” as your manuscript type and also send an email to the guest editor(s) indicating the title of the paper you have submitted: Nancy Tuana, ntuana@psu.edu and Emma Velez, eqv5073@psu.edu.

2019-2020 Fellowship: “The Jewish Home,” Katz Center at UPenn

Call for Applications: Katz Center Fellowship

The Herbert D. Katz Center at The University of Pennsylvania is now accepting applications for the 2019–2020 academic year on the theme of The Jewish Home: Dwelling on the Domestic, the Familial, and the Lived-In.

The Katz Center will devote our 2019–2020 fellowship year to the home—to what happens inside Jewish homes and what connects those homes to life outside. We invite applications from scholars in any academic field who are seeking to advance research that will shed light on this most formative and intimate of contexts for Jewish life, including the very definition of home.

As an object of inquiry, the home has not one door but many. We are planning a year that will look into the Jewish home across many different thresholds/entryways and look back out from the home into the broader world. Relevant topics may include the history of domestic architecture and material culture, anthropological research into kinship, parenting, gender roles, and master-servant relationships; literary instantiations  of the home as an object of memory and imagination; representations of Jewish domesticity in the visual arts, including theater, film, and television; the analysis of Jewish law as it relates to family life and sex; the economics of consumption and display; the ritual study of the life cycle as it plays out in domestic contexts; and urban studies that approach the home as part of neighborhoods or larger social contexts, among others.

Eligible projects may be focused on the home in any period of Jewish history, extending from the four room houses of Iron Age Canaan to contemporary Jewish retirement communities. The year is also open to projects that may not be focused on the home per se but are helpful for understanding it, such as research on the history of privacy or the anthropology of childhood. The Center’s goal is to support individual projects, but it also seeks to develop an intellectually diverse cohort which means the ideal applicant will be one willing to learn from and work with scholars from other disciplines or focused on other periods.

Eligibility

The Katz Center invites applications from scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts at all levels. Applicants must hold a Ph.D. or expect to receive their degree no later than August 2019.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor of Indigenous Religions, Dartmouth College

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover. The Department of Religion at Dartmouth College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level in Indigenous Religions of the Americas, the South Pacific, the Caribbean, or Australia, which may include African diasporic traditions in these regions. Appointment to begin as early as July 1, 2019. Disciplinary and historical specializations are open, but the ideal candidate’s research will demonstrate a substantive focus upon religion, thorough grounding in both theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion, ability to work in the relevant primary languages, and expertise in ethnographic and/or fieldwork approaches (if appropriate).

Since its inception in 1949, the Religion Department has been committed to a multidisciplinary, globally diverse curriculum grounded in the academic study of religion as engaged through a variety of methodological approaches. The Department offers instruction, from the introductory to the advanced level, in most of the world’s major religious traditions: Buddhism; Christianity; Hinduism; Islam; Judaism; the religions of the ancient Near East; the religions of ancient and modern China; religious life in the Americas; and the religions of Africa. The Department offers an undergraduate major and minor. Requirements for this position include teaching four courses per year (0-2 per quarter over 3 quarters) and normal department service. Competitive salary, benefits, and research support. The successful candidate will be expected to teach a broad range of introductory-, intermediate-, and advanced-level courses within his or her specialization, as well as contributing to the Department’s theoretical and methodological offerings. Dartmouth College is an outstanding research institution of 4400 undergraduates, half of whom are women and approximately 40% of whom are members of minority groups.

Qualifications

Applicants should have a PhD or be ABD with PhD expected before the start date of the appointment, along with a record of outstanding scholarship and effective teaching.

Application Instructions

Candidates should submit via Interfolio (http://apply.interfolio.com/51630) a cover letter detailing current and future research plans, teaching experience and philosophy, and contributions to diversity in the context of research, teaching, and/or service; curriculum vitae; writing sample; research statement; teaching portfolio with evidence of teaching effectiveness (e.g., course descriptions, course syllabi); and three confidential letters of recommendation. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Candidates whose applications are received by October 20, 2018, will be considered for a preliminary interview at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion (November 17-20, 2018), or by video conference for those unable to attend the conference.

Job Opening:Theological Social Ethics, Santa Clara University

Assistant Professor in Theological Social Ethics

Religious Studies Department, Santa Clara University

The Department of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University, a private Jesuit Catholic university in Silicon Valley, invites applications for a tenure track position in theological social ethics to start September 1, 2019. The areas of focus are open, but all candidates must demonstrate familiarity with and an ability to engage Catholic social teaching. The department is particularly interested in candidates who can engage the diverse religious and social landscape of Silicon Valley and the complex challenges that arise in the region (e.g., immigration, social inequality, race relations). Candidates should have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in theology or religious studies by the time of appointment; evidence of excellent university-level teaching; an agenda for scholarship leading to publication in the area of theological social ethics; and understand and support the University’s Jesuit mission.

The application deadline is October 15, 2018. For information on the department, visit www.scu.edu/religiousstudies); for the full position description and application instructions, visit https://jobs.scu.edu/postings/7507.