Call for Essays: Religion and (Proto)Feminism in Early Modern Women’s Lives and Works, 1500-1800

Call for Papers

There is a tendency among some contemporary feminists to place religion (especially monotheistic religion) and feminism on opposite ends of the ideological spectrum — as belief systems and sets of practices that contend with and / or threaten each other. Feminist activist Gloria Steinem gave voice to such a perspective in an answer to an interview question about what she wished she had been more responsive to over the years. She professed, “What I should have been more in an uproar about is monotheism and religion…I mean, religion is, too often, politics you’re not supposed to talk about,” though she clarifies she is open to the more “democratic” category of “spirituality.” The “feminist and trade union activist” Cath Elliott is more explicit about her belief that religion is hostile to the feminist cause, “Christianity is and always has been antithetical to women’s freedom and equality, but it’s certainly not alone in this. Whether it’s one of the world’s major faiths or an off-the-wall cult, religion means one thing and one thing only for those women unfortunate enough to get caught up in it: oppression. It’s the patriarchy made manifest, male-dominated, set up by men to protect and perpetuate their power.”

In this interdisciplinary collection, we wish to evaluate, from a historical perspective, the statements made by Steinem and Elliott (among others) on the relationship between religion and (proto) feminism, particularly Elliott’s claim that “Christianity is and always has been antithetical to women’s freedom and equality.” We will accomplish this end by closely analyzing the lives and works of women creating cultural artifacts in Britain and the Americas between 1500 and 1800 — that is between the Renaissance and the inception of the Romantic period. Essays that take into account the intersectionality of women’s identities and works in this historical span are particularly welcome.

In writing their essays, contributors will be expected to pay close attention to the material culture in which women lived and produced a range of works (poetry, plays, prose, drawings, paintings, sculpture, musical compositions, etc.). They will also be asked to draw on the growing body of scholarship on feminism and religion that complicates or troubles (but does not necessarily disprove) the view that feminism and religion are antithetical forces.

300-500-word proposals, along with a CV, should be submitted by e-mail to Dr. Holly Faith Nelson, Professor and Chair of English and Co-Director of the Gender Studies Institute, Trinity Western University, on or before 30 September 2019.

Strong interest in the collection has been expressed by a university press for the series on Early Modern Feminisms.

Contact Info:

Dr. Holly Faith Nelson, Department of English and Creative Writing, Trinity Western University

Contact Email:
holly.nelson (at) twu.ca

Call for Applications: Theology as Interdisciplinary Inquiry, A Writing Workshop for Early Career Scholars

March 2 – April 8, 2020

The Center of Theological Inquiry published Theology as Interdisciplinary Inquiry: Learning with the Natural and Human Sciences in 2017. This volume distills the insights of three interdisciplinary inquiries at CTI in dialogue with anthropology, psychology, and law. Building on this project, the Center welcomes applications from early career scholars—doctoral, post-doctoral, and pre-tenure— who address the methodological question of theology as interdisciplinary inquiry in their own current research.

Applicants must submit a draft thesis/book chapter or a draft article for a peer-reviewed journal on any interdisciplinary theological topic which they would revise as work-in-progress during this full time, intensive writing workshop over six weeks in Princeton. Members of the Writing Workshop work daily in adjacent offices at the Center’s Luce Hall, Monday to Thursday. They present their work in progress in weekly seminars and enjoy daily lunches with the CTI research community. The Center provides furnished housing for workshop members, who must cover all other living costs, including travel.

To apply online by the deadline of May 31, 2019 go to ctinquiry.org/Apply

Questions to apply(at)ctinquiry.org

The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty 2019

Call for Applicants: The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty 2019.

The American Studies Association’s Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies calls for submissions to the seventh annual Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty. This award honors Anzaldúa’s outstanding career as an independent scholar and her labor as contingent faculty, along with her groundbreaking contributions to scholarship to feminist, women of color and queer theory. The award includes a lifetime membership in the ASA, a lifetime electronic subscription to American Quarterly, and $500. Applicants must work in American studies or a related field and work as independent scholars and/or as faculty at community colleges or in a contingent capacity (i.e., as part-time or full-time non-ladder-rank or non-tenure-track instructors, adjuncts, or lecturers). Graduate students are ineligible.

Applicants must submit the following: a cover letter (two pages maximum), a two-page vita; and an essay/paper which does not exceed 25 pages, including end notes and bibliography, and which fulfills one of the following criteria: unpublished, accepted for publication, or published in 2017 or 2018. Relevant submissions will demonstrate an affinity with Anzaldua’s oeuvre, vision, or political commitments and should address connections among some or all the following categories: race, ethnicity, citizenship, class, gender, sexuality, and dis/ability. Please address this affinity in your cover letter.

Please submit your application electronically by MAY 15, 2019, to the committee co-chair, Samantha Pinto (asagenderandsexuality (at) gmail.com). Late submissions will not be accepted. The winner will be contacted regarding arrangements to attend the annual meeting of the association to be held November 7-10, 2019 in Honolulu, Hawai’i, where they will be announced as the awardee at the Generational Gifts Brunch (cosponsored by the Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies, the Critical Ethnic Studies Committee, the Minority Scholars Committee, and the Students Committee).

Visit: https://www.theasa.net/awards/committee-caucus-awards-prizes/gloria-e-anzaldúa-award

Job Posting: Research Fellow/Senior Research Fellow in Autonomy (Australian Catholic University’s Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry)

  • Full-time, Research appointment, five-year fixed-term
  • Based at ACU’s Melbourne Campus

Australian Catholic University’s (ACU) Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry (IRCI) seeks candidates of outstanding potential and demonstrated achievement with expertise in Autonomy, broadly conceived, to contribute to the five-year project, Redeeming Autonomy: Vulnerability and Rationality.

Successful applicants will join a vibrant research environment and work collegially and collaboratively to build their own research profile of high-quality publications, and contribute to team projects within their areas of specialisation and across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Research Fellows and Senior Research Fellows have a primary focus on research, but some teaching, especially of graduate students may be part of the role.

ACU’s IRCI is a research Institute which promotes collaborative research on religion and critical thought from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including philosophy, theology, history, and literature. It explores the inter-relationships between philosophy, religion and their cultural contexts, and contributes to contemporary theological, philosophical, social, and political debates.

The Redeeming Autonomy project seeks to make a strategic intervention in the academic and cultural debate around the concept of ‘autonomy’. The project has two principle dimensions, which it seeks to bring into a fruitful relationship: the conceptual and historical; and the contextual and applied. Applications are invited from candidates whose research addresses an aspect of one, or both, of these strands of the project.

ACU is an inclusive community that welcomes students and staff of all faiths and no faith. It enrolls more than 35,000 students across seven campuses – Adelaide, Ballarat, Brisbane, Canberra, Melbourne, North Sydney and Strathfield (Sydney). As valued members of our community, all staff members are expected to have an understanding of ACU’s mission and values and to demonstrate an active contribution to them.

Remuneration: Research Fellow salary starts at $98,407 + 17% employer superannuation contribution. Senior Research Fellow starts at $123,300 + 17% employer superannuation contribution. In addition, the roles attract a research allowance.

How to Apply:

To apply for this role, visit https://www.timeshighereducation.com/unijobs/en-us/listing/138266/research-fellow-senior-research-fellow-in-autonomy/.

Please consult the Position Description, and address the selection criteria. Please also submit a research sample and a CV, including contact details for three professional referees.

As the Application Form does not have an option specifically to upload Research Samples, please ensure these are uploaded to the “Letter of Application” field in Page 4 of the form.

General enquiries about the role, eligibility, the Program and Institute, and working at ACU Melbourne can be directed to Dr David Kirchhoffer (David.Kirchhoffer (at) acu.edu.au).

Equal Opportunity and Privacy of personal information is University policy. For more details visit www.acu.edu.au/careers

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 13 March 2019

Dissertation Completion Fellowship at Haverford College: Gender & Sexuality Studies with Focus in Visual Studies

The John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College invites applications for a one-year Dissertation Completion Fellowship to begin Fall 2019 in gender and sexuality studies with a focus in visual studies.

We are particularly interested in candidates whose research and teaching interests engage other programs at the College, including Africana Studies, Health Studies, and Peace, Justice, and Human Rights. The successful candidate will teach a one/one course load: one advanced course in their research area and a second course at the introductory level. The fellowship comes with a competitive salary, health benefits, and funds for research and travel.

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, two course proposals (one page max), a one-page timeline outlining how the applicant plans to complete the written portion of the dissertation by June 30, 2020, a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and two confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the applicant’s dissertation advisor attesting to the applicant’s ability to complete the dissertation on schedule, submitted via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/58658 no later than February 15, 2019.

Questions can be directed to Ken Koltun-Fromm (kkoltunf [at] haverford.edu)

John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities

Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041

Visit: https://www.haverford.edu/provost/news/dissertation-completion-fellowship-haverford-college-2019-2020

CfP: CSWIP2019: Feminism & Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

CFP: 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, “Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and ‘Natural’ Worlds”

Call for Papers: the 18th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The theme for the 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities will be Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and “Natural” Worlds. The conference will be held May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The 2020 “Big Berks” focuses on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, and this year devotes special attention to a pressing theme of our current moment: the role of environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems broadly defined in the histories of women, genders, and sexualities. As we plan our meeting at the edge of the Chesapeake Bay, a profoundly vibrant ecosystem where humans have gathered for millennia, we are reminded of the many ways in which the natural world has shaped human society. Its history also highlights the local and global connections of all places. This place is the homeland of the Piscataway Conoy Tribe, and was home to Henrietta Lacks; it is the site of the Baltimore Fish market and a part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, a node in the Atlantic Flyway, and at the edge of the Atlantic World.

Our aim is to hold conversations that think through the intricate interplays among gender and sexuality, social and legal systems of power and political representation, and the material realities of an interconnected world continually shaped by physical nature, the human and nonhuman animals, plants, and other beings that inhabit that nature. If Earth’s history has indeed entered a new geological epoch termed the Anthropocene, where do the historical knowledges and experiences of women, people of diverse genders and sexualities, and people of color, along with environmental justice efforts in the historical past, enter into our efforts to understand, theorize, contextualize, and meet these existential problems?

While the notion of environments invokes important thinking about Earth, our theme extends to a capacious definition of social, cultural, and political surrounds. The histories of women’s lives, intellectualism, and activism unfold across a range of environmental contexts that are simultaneously material, political, economic, and cultural. We interpret this overarching theme broadly, inviting submissions for an array of engaging and interactive presentations intended to generate conversations across time, fields, methodologies, and geographic borders; across races, classes, sexualities and gender identities; among academic and public historians, activists, artists and performers. We are especially keen to attract participants from around the globe and scholars of time periods and geographic fields that typically have been underrepresented at the Berkshire Conference.

We hope these conversations will highlight fresh perspectives and create new networks for intellectual collaboration and activism among scholars, public historians, artists, activists, teachers, and those interested in history, the environment, climate change, social movements, and social justice. Such interaction has dynamic potential to move the history of women, genders, and sexualities in particularly innovative directions that generate new theories and methodologies, bringing these histories into new spaces – not only in our universities and liberal arts colleges but also in community colleges, neighborhood centers, K-12 schools, prisons, NGOs and other activist groups in the United States and abroad. Such an approach is critical as we are experiencing the effects of pressing environmental issues, even as the value of research from climate science to the humanities is being questioned.

Reviving connections between communities and institutions, historians are increasingly joining forces — inside and outside the academy – with an eye toward affecting social change and social justice. New forms of cooperation have raised important historical questions: What can we learn from internationalizing the discussion of women, communities, and the environment? How can we use multi-sited histories of human and non-human animals as well as the relationships of communities to local and distant ecologies to rewrite gendered histories from long distance trade and exchange to the rise of global capitalism? How can scholars and activists collaborate to transform the pedagogical landscape in our ‘classrooms’ around environmental issues in the past and present? This conference is a call for collaboration and cooperation across many lines of difference.

The 2020 Berkshire Conference will be a venue for difficult conversations about these and other crucial questions. In the hope of promoting a greater range of conversations and interactions, this “Big Berks” seeks to intentionally diversify the way we present and discuss history. In addition to traditional modes of presentation, we encourage the submission of conference presentations that feature different kinds of voices. We strongly encourage submissions that include scholars, public historians and/or activists, artists, and/or performers. We also encourage submissions that include multiple styles – such as digital technologies, formal papers, performance, and/or the arts – along with varied formats from e-posters, pop-up talks to lightning sessions. We invite submissions broadly themed on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, including but not limited to those with a special interest in environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems.

The deadline for proposals is Sunday, March 17, 2019.  To submit a proposal, visit: https://berks.confex.com/berks/berks20/cfp.cgi