Dissertation Completion Fellowship at Haverford College: Gender & Sexuality Studies with Focus in Visual Studies

The John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College invites applications for a one-year Dissertation Completion Fellowship to begin Fall 2019 in gender and sexuality studies with a focus in visual studies.

We are particularly interested in candidates whose research and teaching interests engage other programs at the College, including Africana Studies, Health Studies, and Peace, Justice, and Human Rights. The successful candidate will teach a one/one course load: one advanced course in their research area and a second course at the introductory level. The fellowship comes with a competitive salary, health benefits, and funds for research and travel.

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, two course proposals (one page max), a one-page timeline outlining how the applicant plans to complete the written portion of the dissertation by June 30, 2020, a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and two confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the applicant’s dissertation advisor attesting to the applicant’s ability to complete the dissertation on schedule, submitted via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/58658 no later than February 15, 2019.

Questions can be directed to Ken Koltun-Fromm (kkoltunf [at] haverford.edu)

John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities

Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041

Visit: https://www.haverford.edu/provost/news/dissertation-completion-fellowship-haverford-college-2019-2020

CfP: CSWIP2019: Feminism & Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

CFP: 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, “Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and ‘Natural’ Worlds”

Call for Papers: the 18th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The theme for the 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities will be Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and “Natural” Worlds. The conference will be held May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The 2020 “Big Berks” focuses on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, and this year devotes special attention to a pressing theme of our current moment: the role of environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems broadly defined in the histories of women, genders, and sexualities. As we plan our meeting at the edge of the Chesapeake Bay, a profoundly vibrant ecosystem where humans have gathered for millennia, we are reminded of the many ways in which the natural world has shaped human society. Its history also highlights the local and global connections of all places. This place is the homeland of the Piscataway Conoy Tribe, and was home to Henrietta Lacks; it is the site of the Baltimore Fish market and a part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, a node in the Atlantic Flyway, and at the edge of the Atlantic World.

Our aim is to hold conversations that think through the intricate interplays among gender and sexuality, social and legal systems of power and political representation, and the material realities of an interconnected world continually shaped by physical nature, the human and nonhuman animals, plants, and other beings that inhabit that nature. If Earth’s history has indeed entered a new geological epoch termed the Anthropocene, where do the historical knowledges and experiences of women, people of diverse genders and sexualities, and people of color, along with environmental justice efforts in the historical past, enter into our efforts to understand, theorize, contextualize, and meet these existential problems?

While the notion of environments invokes important thinking about Earth, our theme extends to a capacious definition of social, cultural, and political surrounds. The histories of women’s lives, intellectualism, and activism unfold across a range of environmental contexts that are simultaneously material, political, economic, and cultural. We interpret this overarching theme broadly, inviting submissions for an array of engaging and interactive presentations intended to generate conversations across time, fields, methodologies, and geographic borders; across races, classes, sexualities and gender identities; among academic and public historians, activists, artists and performers. We are especially keen to attract participants from around the globe and scholars of time periods and geographic fields that typically have been underrepresented at the Berkshire Conference.

We hope these conversations will highlight fresh perspectives and create new networks for intellectual collaboration and activism among scholars, public historians, artists, activists, teachers, and those interested in history, the environment, climate change, social movements, and social justice. Such interaction has dynamic potential to move the history of women, genders, and sexualities in particularly innovative directions that generate new theories and methodologies, bringing these histories into new spaces – not only in our universities and liberal arts colleges but also in community colleges, neighborhood centers, K-12 schools, prisons, NGOs and other activist groups in the United States and abroad. Such an approach is critical as we are experiencing the effects of pressing environmental issues, even as the value of research from climate science to the humanities is being questioned.

Reviving connections between communities and institutions, historians are increasingly joining forces — inside and outside the academy – with an eye toward affecting social change and social justice. New forms of cooperation have raised important historical questions: What can we learn from internationalizing the discussion of women, communities, and the environment? How can we use multi-sited histories of human and non-human animals as well as the relationships of communities to local and distant ecologies to rewrite gendered histories from long distance trade and exchange to the rise of global capitalism? How can scholars and activists collaborate to transform the pedagogical landscape in our ‘classrooms’ around environmental issues in the past and present? This conference is a call for collaboration and cooperation across many lines of difference.

The 2020 Berkshire Conference will be a venue for difficult conversations about these and other crucial questions. In the hope of promoting a greater range of conversations and interactions, this “Big Berks” seeks to intentionally diversify the way we present and discuss history. In addition to traditional modes of presentation, we encourage the submission of conference presentations that feature different kinds of voices. We strongly encourage submissions that include scholars, public historians and/or activists, artists, and/or performers. We also encourage submissions that include multiple styles – such as digital technologies, formal papers, performance, and/or the arts – along with varied formats from e-posters, pop-up talks to lightning sessions. We invite submissions broadly themed on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, including but not limited to those with a special interest in environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems.

The deadline for proposals is Sunday, March 17, 2019.  To submit a proposal, visit: https://berks.confex.com/berks/berks20/cfp.cgi

Job Posting: Borders and Boundaries: Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at Haverford College, 2019-2021

The John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College invites applications for a two-year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities to begin Fall 2019. We seek a scholar interested in the human activities that construct, maintain, and transform borders and boundaries and in the social, political, and ethical significance of those activities. Candidates should have broad theoretical and interdisciplinary interests; feminist, womanist, mujerista, queer, trans, and intersectional approaches to the study of borders and boundaries are highly encouraged.

During the first year of the program, the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow will participate in a year-long faculty seminar, led by Molly Farneth (Religion), that will bring together faculty with a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including Political Science, History, German, and English. Applicants should make clear the nature of their potential contributions to this interdisciplinary and intersectional inquiry that will explore how people make and remake borders and boundaries through ritual and performance, discipline and policing, care and tending, habituation and imagination.

In the second year, the Fellow will organize and present a spring symposium related to their scholarly field funded by the Hurford Center. During each of the four semesters at Haverford College, the Fellow will teach one course at the introductory/intermediate or advanced level and engage a diverse student body. Applicants should submit two brief course proposals related to their area of interest: one for a broad-based introductory or intermediate course and the other for a more specialized or advanced course.

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, two course proposals, and a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and should arrange to have three confidential letters of recommendation submitted via Interfolio at apply.interfolio.com/57371. Candidates who earned their Ph.D. no earlier than 2014 and have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. by the application deadline of January 9, 2019 are eligible to apply.

Questions can be directed to Noemí Fernández (nfernandez@haverford.edu), John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041

Qualifications

Candidates who earned their Ph.D. no earlier than 2014 and have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. by the application deadline of January 9, 2019 are eligible to apply.

Application Instructions

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, two course proposals, and a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and should arrange to have three confidential letters of recommendation submitted via Interfolio at: https://apply.interfolio.com/57371

Questions can be directed to Noemí Fernández (nfernandez (at) haverford.edu ), Program Manager, John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041.

Book Review Editor, Journal of the American Academy of Religion (JAAR)

The JAAR currently seeks a new book review editor, to begin January 1, 2019.
 
Whoever serves in this position will play a key role in deciding which books are reviewed in the JAAR, and therefore which books receive attention in the discipline, and who reviews them.
The official announcement is available here: https://www.aarweb.org/book-review-editor-JAAR.
If you are interested in serving the journal and the discipline in this way, please do not hesitate to reach out to the JAAR Editor, Andrea Jain, at andrjain (at) iupui.edu.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor of Religion and African-American Studies, Northeastern University

The Department of Philosophy and Religion and the Program in African and African-American Studies in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities at Northeastern University seek to fill a tenure track position of Assistant Professor in the area of Religion, Race and Politics, beginning Fall 2019. The person filling this position will have their tenure home in the Philosophy and Religion Department with a joint appointment in the African and African American Studies Program. The successful candidate will have a strong scholarly record and a commitment to and experience in undergraduate teaching. Candidates will be expected to teach courses in their area of expertise, as well as introductory courses in religious studies and African American Studies. Candidates should have a commitment to fostering diverse and inclusive environments as well as an interest in promoting experiential learning, which are central to a Northeastern University education.

Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Applications received by November 10th will be assured full consideration.

For details and to apply, visit https://neu.peopleadmin.com/postings/57624

CFP: Jewishness and Sexuality in the 20th Century United States

Call for Proposals

Edited volume: Jewishness and Sexuality in the 20th Century United States

Editors: Gillian Frank, Rachel Kranson & Jonathan Krasner

What differences have Jews and Judaism made in the history of American sexuality? How has the history of sexuality shaped the history of American Jews and Judaism?

Historians have investigated the centrality of sexuality to the political, social, and cultural history of the United States. Yet until recently, few historians of sexuality have attended to the important ways that Jewish religious practices, Jewish identities, Jewish culture, Jewish institutions, and Jewish political perspectives have shaped sexual politics, sexual communities and sexual identities over the course of the twentieth century. Likewise, historians of American Jews and Judaism have barely begun to account for the changing meanings of sexuality within American Jewish politics, institutions, practices, and identities.

There are multiple sites in the history of sexuality in the 20th century United States which an analysis of Jewishness will yield productive insights and transform dominant narratives. Likewise, there is so much we cannot understand about American Jewish life in the 20th century United States until we pay more attention to its sexual dimensions. To that end, this edited volume is accepting proposals for historical scholarship that places the categories of Jews, Judaism, and sexuality at the center of analysis in order to map the interrelation of changing Jewish and sexual landscapes. We welcome chapters that take Jewishness as a starting point for rethinking American sexual history and sexuality as a starting point for rethinking American Jewish history. Submissions that respond to the following questions are particularly encouraged:

  • How does focusing on the history of American Jews and Judaism enrich our understanding of the histories of sexualized racial formations; GLBTQ identities, communities and politics; sexual health or disease, eugenics, and social hygiene; commercialized sexuality (e.g., sex work, pornography, performance, popular culture); sexuality and technology; contraception and abortion; courtship, marriage, and divorce; reproduction and adoption; sex advice, sex education and sexual therapy; sexual subcultures; the law and sexuality (e.g., immigration, workplace discrimination, criminal sexuality); abstinence or chastity; gender role construction; and heterosexuality?
  • How does nuanced attention to sexuality reshape conventional narratives of twentieth century American Jewish history; the meanings and influence of secularity, secularization, and the secular; conceptions of Jewish community, Jewish continuity, and/or Jewish politics; the role of Jewish family; Jewish religious formations of racial, ethnic, sexual, gender identity/ies; and religious practices, and narratives of “tradition” and “modernity” alongside historical continuity and change?
  • What discursive and material contexts and practices constructed the relationship between American Jews and sexuality?
  • In what social institutions did Jewish and sexual experiences and ideas intersect?
  • How were Jewish spaces and places deployed variously as sites of sexual and gender socialization, experimentation, discovery, exploitation and/or repression.
  • In what ways have assumptions about sexuality affected the practices and decisions of American Jewish communal institutions, and the distribution of resources and power within those institutions?
  • How have sexual and Jewish identities been constructed in relation or opposition to each other?
  • In what ways have sexual subcultures and communities engaged with American Jews and Judaism?
  • How have Jewish religious authorities, ideas and institutions responded to or shaped sexual values, meanings, practices and identities?
  • How have American Jewish religious authorities’ ideas about (and policing of) sexual norms and deviancies change over time? How have American Jewish religious authorities, groups or institutions informed or enforced social rules about sexual behavior? How have they shaped and reshape dominant sexual meanings?
  • How have religious groups created alternative sexual subcultures?

Please send a proposal of no more than 1500 words to Gillian Frank (gaf4xf (at) virginia.edu), Jonathan Krasner (jkrasner (at) brandeis.edu) and Rachel Kranson (kranson (at) pitt.edu) by January 15, 2019 along with a 1-page CV. Please explicitly reference your major sources of research / archival sources in your proposal. Authors will be notified of decisions by March of 2019. The due date for completed drafts (of between 5000 and 7500 words) is August 15, 2019.