Harvard Women’s Studies in Religion: Research Associate and Visiting Faculty Positions, 2019-2020

HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL announces five full-time positions as Research Associate and Visiting Faculty for 2019-20 in its Women’s Studies in Religion Program.  Proposals for book-length research projects utilizing both religion and gender as central categories of analysis and focusing on any religion are welcomed.  Salary for 2019-20 will be $60,000.   Completed applications are due online by October 15, 2018.  Applicants must have received their PhD by October 1, 2018.  Please see our website (http://wsrp.hds.harvard.edu/apply) for more information.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor in Gender and Peace Studies, Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs invites applications for a tenure-track, assistant professor position in Gender and Peace Studies, based at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. The position will begin in August 2019; Ph.D. degree is required at the time of hire.

The disciplinary specialization for the position is open. Depending on the profile and interests of the successful candidate, the position could have an affiliation with another School or College at the University of Notre Dame.

The Keough School (http://keough.nd.edu), of which the Kroc Institute (http://Kroc.nd.edu ) is an integral part, is particularly interested in scholars who engage in questions of gender and intersectionality as they relate to challenges to peace and prospects for justice and social transformation. The successful applicant is expected to play a leading role in the Kroc Institute’s plans for developing a research and teaching focus on gender, intersectional enquiries, and peace theory and practice, as well as teach in the curricular programs of the Keough School.

The Keough School promotes interdisciplinary research in global affairs and encourages applications from scholars who engage in interdisciplinary research and teaching, and who work on the nexus between theory and practice.

The Kroc Institute is a leading center for the study of strategies for sustainable peace and the causes of violent conflict. Kroc Institute faculty conduct research on the conditions for peace, including the role of peace processes and the causes of war (from local and regional armed conflicts to large-scale international conflicts), as well as genocide, terrorism, ethnic and religious conflict, structural and cultural violence, and violations of human rights. The Kroc Institute offers an undergraduate program in peace studies, a Master’s concentration in peace studies as part of the Keough School’s Master in Global Affairs, and joint Ph.D. programs in Peace Studies with the Departments of Anthropology, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Theology.

All applicants are required to submit a letter of interest and a C.V., and should also arrange for the submission of three letters of reference.  Application materials should be submitted through the Interfolio/Notre Dame online application system: https://apply.interfolio.com/53933. Nominations and inquiries may be sent via email to:

Prof. Asher Kaufman

John M. Regan Jr. Director, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies

Chair, Gender and Peace Studies Search Committee

Keough School of Global Affairs

University of Notre Dame

akaufma2@nd.edu

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2019 Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation has been proud to support more than 22,000 Fellows who collectively have an impressive record of scholarship, teaching, service, and public influence. We hope that you will give your students the opportunity to join this impressive network by sharing the following information about the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation’s 2019 doctoral dissertation fellowships:

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships
woodrow.org/newcombe
The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of religious and ethical values in all areas of human endeavor. Eligible proposals have religious or ethical values as a central concern, and come from fields within the humanities and social sciences. Ph.D. and Th.D. candidates who will be in the final year of dissertation writing during the 2019-2020 academic year may apply.  The competition deadline is November 15, 2018.

Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowships in Women’s Studies
woodrow.org/womens-studies
The Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies encourages original and significant research about women that crosses disciplinary, regional, or cultural boundaries. Previous Fellows have explored such topics as transnational religious education for Muslim women, feminist technology design, the complex gender dynamics of transidentity management, women’s electoral success across racial and institutional contexts, women’s sports, and militarism and the education of American women. The competition deadline is October 15, 2018.

Please see the website for further information: woodrow.org

Questions about the Fellowships may be sent to:
Newcombe Fellowship: newcombe@woodrow.org
Women’s Studies Fellowship: ws@woodrow.org

Call for Abstracts: Humanistic Perspectives on Moral Injury Conference, April 2019, Georgia State

Call for Abstracts:
Humanistic Perspectives on Moral Injury, 11-12 April 2019.

The Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics announces a conference at Georgia State University about moral injury.

On many accounts, moral injury is a form of trauma one may have from participating in or witnessing an act that challenges deeply held values. There are reports of moral injury among members of the armed forces, medical practitioners, journalists, first responders, and others. This conference will feature original research by leading experts and scholars who will draw on the tools of the humanities to theorize moral injury.

We will feature presentations that explore the normative dimensions and implications of trauma for understandings of political authority, interpersonal accountability, civic duty, collective agency/responsibility, recovery from historic injustice, and related themes.

Featured speakers to include:

  •  Ed Barrett (Stockdale Center, United States Naval Academy)
  •   Saba Bazargan-Forward (Philosophy, UC San Diego)
  •   Rita Nakashima Brock (Volunteers of America)
  •   Neta C. Crawford (Political Science, Boston University)
  •   Joseph Galloway (journalist, columnist, and co-author of books such as We Were Soldiers Once… and Young)
  •   Linda Radzik (Philosophy, Texas A&M University)
  •   David Rodin (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict)
  •   Nancy Sherman (Philosophy, Georgetown University)

    To propose a paper, prepare the following:

  1. 1)  An email containing name(s), contact information for session speaker(s), and paper title.
  2. 2)  In a .pdf or MS Word attachment suitable for blind review, a title and 250-500 word abstract.

Please send to Lauren Michelle Cooper at lcooper14@gsu.edu by 6 November 2018 at 17:00 UTC. Submissions will be acknowledged promptly. Authors of proposals will be notified by 20 December 2018. Contact information: Andrew I. Cohen aicohen@gsu.edu

2019-20 Harvard Divinity School/Women’s Studies in Religion Program Research Associate

Harvard Divinity School announces five full-time positions as Research Associate and Visiting Faculty for 2019-20 in its Women’s Studies in Religion Program. Proposals for book-length research projects utilizing both religion and gender as central categories of analysis and focusing on any religion are welcomed. Salary for 2019-20 will be $60,000. Completed applications are due online by October 15, 2018. Applicants must have received their PhD by October 1, 2018. Please see the website (http://wsrp.hds.harvard.edu/apply) for more information.

CFP: Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State

Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State

Date: February 22, 2019

Location: Luskin Conference Center, UCLA

Call for Proposals

Deadline: Sunday, October 28 at 11:59 PM (PDT)

The UCLA Center for the Study of Women invites submissions of graduate student paper, roundtable presentation, and poster proposals, and undergraduate student poster proposals for our 29th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference.

This year’s conference theme, Feminists Confronting the Carceral State, will focus on gendered regimes of captivity, state violence, and incarceration, emphasizing feminist, queer, trans, abolitionist, and intersectional interventions. The conference will feature a keynote panel of scholars and activists, including:

  • Beth Richie, Professor of African American Studies and Criminology, Law and Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Alisa Bierria, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies, UC Riverside
  • Colby Lenz, Organizer, Survived and Punished and California Coalition of Women Prisoners; and PhD Student, American Studies and Ethnicity, USC
  • Romarilyn Ralston, Program Coordinator, Project Rebound, California State University Fullerton

Much of the policy and research on punishment in the United States has focused on men. Yet, the history and contemporary reality of women’s subjugation to systems of punishment also runs deep and warrants further exploration. Many young women and girls, especially Black, Brown, and Native girls, are ensnared in the carceral state where they are criminalized and surveilled in schools, foster systems, and in their communities. Moreover, transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals are particularly vulnerable to policing and incarceration and state-sanctioned violence.

Feminist abolitionist Angela Davis has illuminated the carceral state’s gendered structure, elaborating the numerous ways that women and LGBTQ communities are made vulnerable to violence, oppression, and harm. In addition to examining the complex range of regimes that constitute the carceral state, and the modes of violence therein, Feminists Confronting the Carceral State heeds Davis’s call for abolition democracy, including broad societal change: the “demilitarization of schools, revitalization of education at all levels, a health system that provides free physical and mental care to all, and a justice system based on reparation and reconciliation rather than retribution and vengeance” (Davis, 2003, pg. 107). This begs the question: how do feminists lead this modern abolitionist movement and rebuild a society deeply scarred by its own criminal justice system?

Feminists Confronting the Carceral State invites presenters to think through approaches that consider the social contexts in which the carceral state operates in feminist, queer, intersectional, and critical ways. Given recent re-commitments to “tough on crime” beliefs and policies, feminists must be at the forefront of resisting and dismantling the carceral state in all areas of society.

We invite proposals for papers, roundtable presentations, and posters from graduate students, and posters from undergraduate students. Successful submissions will center analyses of sexuality, gender, and/or feminism. This is an interdisciplinary conference and we encourage submissions from all fields of study. Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

  • State-sponsored violence
  • Racialized policing and surveillance
  • Studies of specific institutional modes of power, such as prisons, jails, and detention centers
  • Processes of carceral expansion
  • Immigration and detention
  • Anti-carceral art
  • Transformative justice
  • Cultural logics of white supremacy, settler colonialism, and xenophobia
  • Cultural/media representations of incarceration
  • Historical and contemporary abolitionist, feminist, and queer anti-carceral activism/organizing
  • Histories of captivity and imprisonment
  • Youth/Girlhood
  • Political repression
  • “Gender responsive” punishment and carceral feminism
  • Prisons, toxicity, and the environment
  • Reproductive justice
  • Criminalization of gender and sexual nonconformity
  • Political economies of punishment
  • Social institutions and carceral control (i.e. education, foster care, mental health, housing, health care)
  • Transnational and diasporic analyses

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Eligibility

Registered graduate students from any institution are eligible to submit paper, roundtable presentation, and poster proposals.

Registered undergraduate students from any institution are eligible to submit proposals for poster presentations only.

Individuals may present in only one capacity at the conference, although you may submit an application to be considered in all presentation categories.

Unpublished papers are preferred for submission. Recently published and forthcoming papers will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Registration Fee

To participate in Thinking Gender, successful applicants will be required to pay a registration fee of $50, the entirety of which will go towards covering conference costs.

Deadline for Proposal Submissions

Deadline for Paper and Poster Proposals: Sunday, October 28, 2018, at 11:59PM PDT

Once submissions are reviewed and accepted, all participants in the paper panel sessions will be required to submit a draft of their paper by January 28, 2019, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

Online Application Form

All proposals must be submitted using the online application form: https://csw.ucla.edu/tg19-app

MODES OF RESEARCH PARTICIPATION

**GRADUATE STUDENT APPLICANTS ONLY: If you would like your application to be considered for more than one type of presentation, please follow the submission guidelines for Paper Panel Presentations.**

Graduate Paper Panel Presentations:

Paper Panels will be comprised of graduate student paper presenters and a faculty moderator who will read and provide detailed feedback and questions on each paper. Paper presentations will be 12 minutes long. Panelists will be required to submit their paper drafts by January 28, 2019, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

Panel Presentation application requirements:

  1. Paper proposal (2-3 double-spaced page maximum) that includes a thesis/research question, discussion of methodology and theoretical framework, explanation of your argument and supporting data, and conclusions or anticipated conclusions
  2. Works Cited or Reference List (1 page maximum)
  3. CV (2 page maximum)

Graduate Roundtable Sessions:

Roundtable sessions will provide presenters and attendees the opportunity to interact and engage with one another’s scholarship in a less formal setting than a Paper Panel. Graduate students with papers in development who are not yet ready to present on a paper panel are encouraged to apply for a roundtable presentation. Presenters will each have 5 minutes to present their work and 5 minutes for feedback, to be followed by general discussion with roundtable participants. Accepted proposals will be grouped by shared themes and interests, and assigned to a roundtable chair who will facilitate the discussion.

Roundtable application requirements:

  1. Proposal abstract (200 words maximum) that includes a thesis/research question, discussion of your argument, and anticipated conclusions
  2. Works Cited or Reference List (1 page maximum)
  3. CV (2 page maximum)

Graduate and Undergraduate Poster Session:

Graduate and Undergraduate students will present visually compelling research posters. During the poster session, each presenter will be present with their poster for discussions and questions with circulating attendees. Posters will remain on display throughout the conference.

Poster Session application requirements:

  1. Poster proposal (1-2 double-spaced page maximum) that includes a thesis/research question, discussion of methodology and theoretical framework, explanation of your argument and supporting data, and conclusions or anticipated conclusions
  2. Works Cited or Reference List (1 page maximum)
  3. CV (2 page maximum)

All materials must be submitted online: https://csw.ucla/edu/tg19-app

Deadline for Paper and Poster Proposals: Sunday, October 28, 2018, at 11:59PM PDT

Only complete submissions received by the deadline will be considered.

Questions? Contact Shena Sanchez, 2019 Thinking Gender Conference Coordinator, thinkinggender (at) women.ucla.edu

Visit: https://csw.ucla.edu/tg19-cfp

CFP: Sexuality and Borders – Symposium

Call for Papers

Sexuality and Borders

Symposium, 4-5 April 2019
Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University, NYC

In her path-breaking work Borderlands/La Frontera (1987), Gloria E. Anzaldúa parsed out the relationship between heteronormativity and the stretching of the border into various borderlands, subjectivities, and temporalities. In the context of growing migration and the accompanying intensification of border regimes, this formative thesis on the relationship between borders and sexuality needs renewed attention and consideration. How do sexuality and borders intersect? What role does sexuality play in the production, maintenance and disruption of contemporary border regimes? How do borders as features of racial capitalism multiply inequalities via sexuality and, conversely, how is sexuality mediated through racialized border regimes? While people continue to move across borders, sexuality becomes a dominant frame through which such movement is attempted to be captured, framed, and contained. At the same time, the border becomes understood, organized, and contested through sexuality and sexual discourse.

In response to these phenomena, this symposium conceptualizes sexuality as a method of bordering and thinks sexuality beyond identity towards its multifarious entanglements with contemporary border regimes. From sexual panics about migrant sexuality, the pornotropic gaze of surveillance technologies, to media discourses about reproduction and contagion, sexuality can be said to play a key role in how borders are policed and managed. At the same time, intimacy, desire, and sexuality have become rallying points in challenging borders as seen in queer activism against deportations, critiques of homonationalism and imaginations of different sexual futures and political horizons. Bringing together scholars from a variety of disciplinary and regional contexts, this symposium aims to show how sexuality matters for the study of and struggles around borders.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Intimacy of border control, touch, and the haptic
  • Sexual transmission, deviancy, and national health
  • Family, state and, national reproduction
  • Sexual panics and the intensification of border regimes
  • Trans perspectives on gendered and sexualised border regimes
  • Sexual violence, detention, and state violence
  • Sex work, discourses of trafficking, and migrant sex work activism
  • Digital borders, pornography, mediation
  • Homonationalism(s)
  • Technologies of border control and sexuality
  • Surveillance, voyeurism, pornotropics
  • Entanglement of anti-migrant and anti-queer/feminist politics
  • Virality, sexuality, and contagion across borders
  • Queer of colour critique and critical migration studies
  • Affect, desire, and queer/no border futurities
  • Biopolitical borders, demography, and population
  • Queer temporalities, archives, and histories of migration
  • LGBTQ refugees and migrants
  • Queer and feminist activism around/against borders

Sexuality and Borders is a two day symposium hosted and funded by New York University’s Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. It is co-sponsored by NYU’s Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the DFG-funded research training group “Minor Cosmopolitanisms” (University of Potsdam, Germany) and is supported by LSE’s Department of Gender Studies.

Confirmed Keynotes:

  • Radha Hegde (Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU)
  • Miriam Ticktin (Associate Professor of Anthropology, New School for Social Research)
  • Alyosxa Tudor (Assistant Professor of Gender Studies, SOAS University of London)

Applications

Please send proposals for papers (no longer than 350 words) and a short bio (150 words) by November 1st, 2018 to sexualityandborders@tutanota.com. As an interdisciplinary symposium, we encourage applications that engage a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches and focus on different geopolitical contexts. We aim to enable discussions across academic, artistic and activist debates and also welcome applications from participants outside the academy.

Organizing team

  • Michelle Pfeifer (NYU, Department of Media, Culture, and Communication Department)
  • Billy Holzberg (London School of Economics, Gender Institute)
  • Anouk Madörin (University of Potsdam, RTG Minor Cosmopolitanisms).

For questions please contact sexualityandborders@tutanota.com

Visit https://sexualityandborders.wordpress.com/