CFP: Sexuality and Borders – Symposium

Call for Papers

Sexuality and Borders

Symposium, 4-5 April 2019
Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University, NYC

In her path-breaking work Borderlands/La Frontera (1987), Gloria E. Anzaldúa parsed out the relationship between heteronormativity and the stretching of the border into various borderlands, subjectivities, and temporalities. In the context of growing migration and the accompanying intensification of border regimes, this formative thesis on the relationship between borders and sexuality needs renewed attention and consideration. How do sexuality and borders intersect? What role does sexuality play in the production, maintenance and disruption of contemporary border regimes? How do borders as features of racial capitalism multiply inequalities via sexuality and, conversely, how is sexuality mediated through racialized border regimes? While people continue to move across borders, sexuality becomes a dominant frame through which such movement is attempted to be captured, framed, and contained. At the same time, the border becomes understood, organized, and contested through sexuality and sexual discourse.

In response to these phenomena, this symposium conceptualizes sexuality as a method of bordering and thinks sexuality beyond identity towards its multifarious entanglements with contemporary border regimes. From sexual panics about migrant sexuality, the pornotropic gaze of surveillance technologies, to media discourses about reproduction and contagion, sexuality can be said to play a key role in how borders are policed and managed. At the same time, intimacy, desire, and sexuality have become rallying points in challenging borders as seen in queer activism against deportations, critiques of homonationalism and imaginations of different sexual futures and political horizons. Bringing together scholars from a variety of disciplinary and regional contexts, this symposium aims to show how sexuality matters for the study of and struggles around borders.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Intimacy of border control, touch, and the haptic
  • Sexual transmission, deviancy, and national health
  • Family, state and, national reproduction
  • Sexual panics and the intensification of border regimes
  • Trans perspectives on gendered and sexualised border regimes
  • Sexual violence, detention, and state violence
  • Sex work, discourses of trafficking, and migrant sex work activism
  • Digital borders, pornography, mediation
  • Homonationalism(s)
  • Technologies of border control and sexuality
  • Surveillance, voyeurism, pornotropics
  • Entanglement of anti-migrant and anti-queer/feminist politics
  • Virality, sexuality, and contagion across borders
  • Queer of colour critique and critical migration studies
  • Affect, desire, and queer/no border futurities
  • Biopolitical borders, demography, and population
  • Queer temporalities, archives, and histories of migration
  • LGBTQ refugees and migrants
  • Queer and feminist activism around/against borders

Sexuality and Borders is a two day symposium hosted and funded by New York University’s Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. It is co-sponsored by NYU’s Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the DFG-funded research training group “Minor Cosmopolitanisms” (University of Potsdam, Germany) and is supported by LSE’s Department of Gender Studies.

Confirmed Keynotes:

  • Radha Hegde (Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU)
  • Miriam Ticktin (Associate Professor of Anthropology, New School for Social Research)
  • Alyosxa Tudor (Assistant Professor of Gender Studies, SOAS University of London)

Applications

Please send proposals for papers (no longer than 350 words) and a short bio (150 words) by November 1st, 2018 to sexualityandborders@tutanota.com. As an interdisciplinary symposium, we encourage applications that engage a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches and focus on different geopolitical contexts. We aim to enable discussions across academic, artistic and activist debates and also welcome applications from participants outside the academy.

Organizing team

  • Michelle Pfeifer (NYU, Department of Media, Culture, and Communication Department)
  • Billy Holzberg (London School of Economics, Gender Institute)
  • Anouk Madörin (University of Potsdam, RTG Minor Cosmopolitanisms).

For questions please contact sexualityandborders@tutanota.com

Visit https://sexualityandborders.wordpress.com/

Book Series: Explorations in Contemporary Social-Political Philosophy, Rowman-Littlefield

As our world continues to be buffeted by extreme changes in society and politics, philosophers can help navigate these disruptions. Rowman and Littlefield’s ECSPP series books are intended for supplementary classroom use in intermediate to advanced college-level courses to introduce philosophy students and scholars in related fields to the latest research in social-political philosophy. This philosophical series will have multidisciplinary distribution and the potential to reach a broad audience of students, scholars, and general readers.

We seek concise student-oriented books written with philosophical insight and analysis but in accessible prose without jargon and with practical examples for multidisciplinary and general readers. The books should address and explore significant or controversial contemporary social-political questions and be suitable for a wide range of courses throughout the humanities (Philosophy, English and Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, Ethnic and Gender Studies, Justice Studies, Religious Studies, Communication, Journalism).

Prospective authors should send nmandziuk@rowman.com (Natalie Mandziuk, acquisitions editor), lshrage@fiu.edu, and nzack@uoregon.edu a brief query about your manuscript, prospectus, OR description of a manuscript in progress.

 

Editor(s): Naomi Zack and Laurie Shrage

 

More information: https://rowman.com/Action/SERIES/_/ECSPPRLG/Explorations-in-Contemporary-Social-Political-Philosophy#

Job Opening: Kyung-Chik Han Chair of Asian American Theology, Princeton Theological Seminar

Princeton Theological Seminary seeks a scholar to occupy the Kyung-Chik Han Chair of Asian American Theology. Applicants should be theologians (systematic, constructive, or historical) whose scholarship and teaching give critical attention to Asian American experience and ecclesial life. Other areas of specialization are open to negotiation. Candidates should be willing to contribute to the Asian American Program at PTS. Appointment at the level of associate or full professor will be made with tenure. Appointment at the level of assistant professor will be tenure track, but the appointee will only occupy the Han Chair upon successful completion of the Seminary’s tenure and promotion review process. Applicants are expected to have a portfolio of published research and teaching experience in the field and to hold a Ph.D. or its equivalent. The successful candidate will teach in all the Seminary’s masters’ and Ph.D. degree programs, pursue an active scholarly research agenda, and participate in the life of the Seminary. As Princeton Theological Seminary is related to the Presbyterian Church (USA), faculty members are expected to work constructively within an ecumenical ethos informed by the Reformed Tradition. The appointment is expected to commence July 1, 2019. Women and candidates from underrepresented communities are especially encouraged to apply.

Applicants should send (1) a letter of interest; (2) a CV (including bibliography); and (3) a list of three potential recommenders to academic.dean@ptsem.edu.

Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2018. Princeton Theological Seminary is an equal opportunity employer.

Hypatia Special Issue on Decolonial Feminisms

Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy seeks papers for a special issue (35: 3, Summer 2020) on decolonial feminisms, guest edited by Nancy Tuana and Emma Velez. There has been a great deal of work, from an array of diverse contexts and traditions, on the articulation of the “decolonial turn” in philosophy. Of particular importance to the articulation of decolonial theory has been the work from theorists emerging out of the Latin American and Latinx context. Engaged with, but seeking to differentiate their theory from the anticolonial work of postcolonial theory, decolonial philosophers have emphasized the importance of the still lingering structures of colonialism in power, ontology, and, the imposed logics of race and gender. This work has been at times influenced by, as well as developed in parallel to, decolonial philosophy from Africana and Caribbean philosophy as well as from indigenous philosophy. However, much more work is required to further the articulation of decolonial feminisms as an emergent methodological orientation to anticolonial theory and to trace both the specific contributions of Latin American and Latinx philosophy to the development of decolonial philosophy, as well as the intersecting lineages with other approaches to decolonial and/or post-colonial philosophy.

We welcome feminist scholarship on decolonial philosophy that traces lineages informed by Latin American/Latinx feminist philosophy. We encourage investigations of lines of influence, as well as points of convergence and divergence between Latin American/Latinx feminist decolonial thought and decolonial philosophical investigations from Africana and Caribbean philosophy as well as indigenous philosophy.

We invite submissions that take up feminist philosophy in relation to Latin American/Latinx approaches to decolonial philosophy. We welcome feminist approaches that compare Latin American/Latinx decolonial philosophical approaches to those emerging from Africana and Caribbean philosophy, as well as from indigenous philosophy. We are also interested in approaches that trace intersections as well as discontinuities between decolonial and postcolonial feminisms. We welcome papers that focus on specific decolonial philosophers or compare within or across decolonial traditions. We are also interested in papers that offer theoretical and/or practical feminist decolonial investigations of gender, race, rationality, sexuality, and modernity.

Topics to consider may include, but are not limited to:

Latinx and feminist engagements with decolonial philosophy
Decolonial engagements with feminist philosophy
Women, gender, and sexuality in Non-Western contexts
Challenges to Western conceptions of the categories of woman, gender, and sexuality
Feminist decolonial praxis
Genealogies of decolonial thinking in Latin American/Latinx feminist philosophy
Latin American/Latinx lineages in decolonial philosophy
Intersectionality and decolonial philosophy
Discontinuities between decolonial philosophy and feminist philosophy
Decolonial conceptions of feminist pedagogy
Intersecting lineages
Submission deadline: December 1, 2018

Papers should be no more than 8000 words, inclusive of notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, and accompanied by an abstract of no more than 200 words. In addition to articles, we invite submissions for our Musings section. These should not exceed 3,000 words, including footnotes and references. All submissions will be subject to external review. For details please see Hypatia’s submission guidelines.

Please submit your paper to: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/hypa. When you submit, make sure to select “Toward Decolonial Feminisms” as your manuscript type and also send an email to the guest editor(s) indicating the title of the paper you have submitted: Nancy Tuana, ntuana@psu.edu and Emma Velez, eqv5073@psu.edu.

2019-2020 Fellowship: “The Jewish Home,” Katz Center at UPenn

Call for Applications: Katz Center Fellowship

The Herbert D. Katz Center at The University of Pennsylvania is now accepting applications for the 2019–2020 academic year on the theme of The Jewish Home: Dwelling on the Domestic, the Familial, and the Lived-In.

The Katz Center will devote our 2019–2020 fellowship year to the home—to what happens inside Jewish homes and what connects those homes to life outside. We invite applications from scholars in any academic field who are seeking to advance research that will shed light on this most formative and intimate of contexts for Jewish life, including the very definition of home.

As an object of inquiry, the home has not one door but many. We are planning a year that will look into the Jewish home across many different thresholds/entryways and look back out from the home into the broader world. Relevant topics may include the history of domestic architecture and material culture, anthropological research into kinship, parenting, gender roles, and master-servant relationships; literary instantiations  of the home as an object of memory and imagination; representations of Jewish domesticity in the visual arts, including theater, film, and television; the analysis of Jewish law as it relates to family life and sex; the economics of consumption and display; the ritual study of the life cycle as it plays out in domestic contexts; and urban studies that approach the home as part of neighborhoods or larger social contexts, among others.

Eligible projects may be focused on the home in any period of Jewish history, extending from the four room houses of Iron Age Canaan to contemporary Jewish retirement communities. The year is also open to projects that may not be focused on the home per se but are helpful for understanding it, such as research on the history of privacy or the anthropology of childhood. The Center’s goal is to support individual projects, but it also seeks to develop an intellectually diverse cohort which means the ideal applicant will be one willing to learn from and work with scholars from other disciplines or focused on other periods.

Eligibility

The Katz Center invites applications from scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts at all levels. Applicants must hold a Ph.D. or expect to receive their degree no later than August 2019.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor of Indigenous Religions, Dartmouth College

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover. The Department of Religion at Dartmouth College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level in Indigenous Religions of the Americas, the South Pacific, the Caribbean, or Australia, which may include African diasporic traditions in these regions. Appointment to begin as early as July 1, 2019. Disciplinary and historical specializations are open, but the ideal candidate’s research will demonstrate a substantive focus upon religion, thorough grounding in both theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion, ability to work in the relevant primary languages, and expertise in ethnographic and/or fieldwork approaches (if appropriate).

Since its inception in 1949, the Religion Department has been committed to a multidisciplinary, globally diverse curriculum grounded in the academic study of religion as engaged through a variety of methodological approaches. The Department offers instruction, from the introductory to the advanced level, in most of the world’s major religious traditions: Buddhism; Christianity; Hinduism; Islam; Judaism; the religions of the ancient Near East; the religions of ancient and modern China; religious life in the Americas; and the religions of Africa. The Department offers an undergraduate major and minor. Requirements for this position include teaching four courses per year (0-2 per quarter over 3 quarters) and normal department service. Competitive salary, benefits, and research support. The successful candidate will be expected to teach a broad range of introductory-, intermediate-, and advanced-level courses within his or her specialization, as well as contributing to the Department’s theoretical and methodological offerings. Dartmouth College is an outstanding research institution of 4400 undergraduates, half of whom are women and approximately 40% of whom are members of minority groups.

Qualifications

Applicants should have a PhD or be ABD with PhD expected before the start date of the appointment, along with a record of outstanding scholarship and effective teaching.

Application Instructions

Candidates should submit via Interfolio (http://apply.interfolio.com/51630) a cover letter detailing current and future research plans, teaching experience and philosophy, and contributions to diversity in the context of research, teaching, and/or service; curriculum vitae; writing sample; research statement; teaching portfolio with evidence of teaching effectiveness (e.g., course descriptions, course syllabi); and three confidential letters of recommendation. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Candidates whose applications are received by October 20, 2018, will be considered for a preliminary interview at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion (November 17-20, 2018), or by video conference for those unable to attend the conference.

Job Opening:Theological Social Ethics, Santa Clara University

Assistant Professor in Theological Social Ethics

Religious Studies Department, Santa Clara University

The Department of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University, a private Jesuit Catholic university in Silicon Valley, invites applications for a tenure track position in theological social ethics to start September 1, 2019. The areas of focus are open, but all candidates must demonstrate familiarity with and an ability to engage Catholic social teaching. The department is particularly interested in candidates who can engage the diverse religious and social landscape of Silicon Valley and the complex challenges that arise in the region (e.g., immigration, social inequality, race relations). Candidates should have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in theology or religious studies by the time of appointment; evidence of excellent university-level teaching; an agenda for scholarship leading to publication in the area of theological social ethics; and understand and support the University’s Jesuit mission.

The application deadline is October 15, 2018. For information on the department, visit www.scu.edu/religiousstudies); for the full position description and application instructions, visit https://jobs.scu.edu/postings/7507.

Job Opening: Danforth Chair of Theology, Saint Louis University

The Department of Theological Studies at SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY invites distinguished applicants for the Danforth Chair. We seek an Associate or Full professor, and strongly encourage women and members of other underrepresented groups to apply.

Saint Louis University is a nationally ranked research university and has set ambitious benchmarks for research excellence and productivity. The Department of Theological Studies has an outstanding record of research awards and publications with leading university presses and journals – the Danforth chair will be expected to strengthen this emphasis. Candidates will have a distinguished publication record and an ambitious research agenda commensurate with the rank at which they are hired.

The research agenda of the Danforth chairholder will diversify existing expertise as well as methodological approaches within the Department. Area of specialization is open, though the Chair will be expected to strengthen one or both concentrations of our redesigned doctoral program (Christianity in Antiquity and Christian Theology). For more information on these two programs and our faculty, please visit our website: https://www.slu.edu/arts-and-sciences/theological-studies.

The standard teaching assignment in the department is 2/2; the Danforth chairholder also receives a graduate assistant. Successful candidates will teach a range of subjects at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

As one of our visible leaders, the Danforth chair will be asked to stimulate innovation within the Department, represent us effectively to wider constituencies and strengthen recruitment efforts for our programs. A record of professional leadership in the candidate’s field is highly desirable.

Regardless of his or her own faith tradition, the successful candidate will demonstrate a strong commitment to the university’s Catholic and Jesuit mission, which affirms the importance of diversity and fosters an inclusive work environment (https://www.slu.edu/about/catholic-jesuit-identity/mission.php)

Saint Louis University, founded in 1818, is one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious Catholic universities. It is located in Midtown Saint Louis, within walking distance of the Theatre district and the Central West End, which was recently voted as one of the country’s top 10 neighborhoods. We are surrounded by nationally ranked medical centers, abundant cultural and recreational venues, and the Midwest’s premier innovation hub for technology research. Our region also boasts the 5 top-rated public school districts in Missouri.

All applications are made online at http://jobs.slu.edu and include a (1) cover letter, (2) curriculum vitae, (3) statement of research agenda, (4) a teaching statement where we invite you to reflect on high impact pedagogical practices and strategies for engaging a diverse student body, and (5) contact information for three letters of reference.

We will begin reviewing applications immediately until the position is filled.

Questions about this position should be directed to the chair of the search: Mary Dunn, Department of Theological Studies, Saint Louis University, 3800 Lindell Blvd., Saint Louis, MO 63108. Contact email: mary.dunn@slu.edu.

Saint Louis University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Job Opening: Assistant Professor of Theology, Boston University

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY invites applications for a full-time tenure-track faculty position in Theology at the rank of Assistant Professor, to begin in Fall 2019. The successful candidate will be an outstanding scholar in theology, holding a PhD or ThD in theology or an appropriate, equivalent degree, and having potential for a strong record of publications in the field. An additional seminary degree (e.g., MDiv, MTS, MAR) is highly desirable. We seek candidates who will build on Boston University’s historic commitment to pursuing philosophical theology from a comparative perspective with expertise in study areas beyond the western European traditions such as (but not limited to) Asian, African, Latinx, Womanist, Queer, and/or Postcolonial studies. Areas of expertise are open, but candidates should be competent to teach an introduction to the philosophical tradition(s) in which they are expert, the core introductory sequence in theology, as well as specialized courses in their area of expertise. Responsibilities include teaching, advising, conducting research, and contributing to the larger work of the School. The School is committed to the formation of intercultural competence and social justice in all aspects of our learning community, and we seek candidates who are eager and skilled in providing leadership to realize these goals.

 

Candidates should be committed to the School’s mission of preparing leaders at the masters and doctoral level for diverse forms of ministry in religious communities and other organizations, as well as teaching doctoral students for the professoriate and other forms of scholarship within the interdisciplinary context of a research university. Responsibilities include teaching four courses per year as part of the master’s and doctoral programs of the School of Theology.

 

Boston University expects excellence in teaching and research and is dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse faculty and staff committed to engaged scholarship in a multicultural environment. Boston University School of Theology is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Applications should include a curriculum vita, statement of teaching and research plans, a major publication sample, and three professional references (sent separately). As part of the teaching statement (or cover letter), candidates are invited to describe their cultural competencies and experiences engaging a diverse student body. Materials should be sent to the Faculty Search Committee, Boston University School of Theology, 745 Commonwealth Avenue, Suite 110, Boston, MA 02215. Applications may be submitted as email attachments to Emily Arnone at earnone@bu.edu.

 

Review of applications will begin October 1, 2018, and will continue until a suitable candidate is selected. We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

Job Opening: History of Modern Philosophy, UMass Amherst

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, Amherst, MA.

Rank: Assistant Professor.  (Under exceptional circumstances, highly qualified candidates at other ranks may receive consideration.) Starting Date: September 1, 2019.

AOS: History of Modern Philosophy.

AOC: Open.

Undergraduate and graduate teaching, two courses per semester, with usual non-teaching duties.  Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.  Ph.D. in Philosophy or closely related field required by time of appointment.

Applicants should apply online at https://secure.dc4.pageuppeople.com/apply/822/gateway/Default.aspx?c=apply&sJobIDs=495308&SourceTypeID=801&sLanguage=en-us.  Be sure to include a CV, a cover letter, a writing sample, evidence of effective teaching (such as summaries of teaching evaluations and/or a teaching statement), and the names and email addresses of at least three references.  Inquiries about the position can be addressed to Professor Phillip Bricker, Chair, Philosophy Search Committee, bricker@philos.umass.edu.

Applicants should apply by the priority deadline of October 15, 2018, in order to ensure consideration.

The University is committed to active recruitment of a diverse faculty and student body.  The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members.  Because broad diversity is essential to an inclusive climate and critical to the University’s goals of achieving excellence in all areas, we will holistically assess the many qualifications of each applicant and favorably consider an individual’s record working with students and colleagues with broadly diverse perspectives, experiences, and backgrounds in educational, research or other work activities.  We will also favorably consider experience overcoming or helping others overcome barriers to an academic degree and career.