Dissertation Completion Fellowship at Haverford College: Gender & Sexuality Studies with Focus in Visual Studies

The John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College invites applications for a one-year Dissertation Completion Fellowship to begin Fall 2019 in gender and sexuality studies with a focus in visual studies.

We are particularly interested in candidates whose research and teaching interests engage other programs at the College, including Africana Studies, Health Studies, and Peace, Justice, and Human Rights. The successful candidate will teach a one/one course load: one advanced course in their research area and a second course at the introductory level. The fellowship comes with a competitive salary, health benefits, and funds for research and travel.

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, two course proposals (one page max), a one-page timeline outlining how the applicant plans to complete the written portion of the dissertation by June 30, 2020, a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and two confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the applicant’s dissertation advisor attesting to the applicant’s ability to complete the dissertation on schedule, submitted via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/58658 no later than February 15, 2019.

Questions can be directed to Ken Koltun-Fromm (kkoltunf [at] haverford.edu)

John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities

Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041

Visit: https://www.haverford.edu/provost/news/dissertation-completion-fellowship-haverford-college-2019-2020

Call for Papers: Queer Political Theologies Special Issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies

Edited by Ricky Varghese (Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis), David K. Seitz (Harvey Mudd

College), and Fan Wu (University of Toronto)

The contested field of political theology asks after the seemingly persistent theological, religious, and metaphysical character of people’s affective investments in political institutions and forms of life, including putatively secular ones. Political theology attends to what remains, what lingers— perhaps transfigured or rescaled—at scenes of crisis, catastrophe, and change, in moments when forms of life undergo profound structural and spiritual transformation. This special issue emerges from our observation that political theology, queer theory, religious studies, and queer theology already share in a critical hesitation about the pretensions of the modern subject as secular, sovereign, disillusioned, and bereft of metaphysical attachments; and in a curiosity about the psychic, visceral, ontological, and affective character of subject formation. Our aim, then, is not merely to “queer” political theology—to make a set of queerly informed postulates out of theology—but also to ask what is already queer about the intersections and junctures of the political and the theological.

We invite work that shares our curiosity about how the queer as an ontological, ethico-political, historical, and materialist category worthy of exploration might in itself emerge from the meeting of the political and the theological. We welcome scholarship that approaches the political and the theological themselves as categories that are deeply invested in configurations of modernity, subjectivity, and ontology—work that asks after the queerness that inheres or festers in the relationships between modernity, subjectivity, and ontology, broadly conceived. Queer political theologies might investigate scenes of jointure and investiture between otherwise inchoate, abject, quivering, creaturely, or fleshy bodies and sacralising political orders or religious praxes that imbue them with significance.

We approach this work with a keen awareness of the fraught stakes of gathering together scholarship from multiple fields and trajectories (queer theory, political theology, queer theology, religious studies, and more) under the banner of “queer political theology” in particular. Indeed, distinct scholarly traditions, not all of them historically friendly to emancipatory ethical, political, and intellectual aims, have infected “political theology” quite differently. While European(ist) political theologies have focused on the psychical and spiritual consequences of the shift from monarchical sovereignty to biopolitical forms of popular sovereignty, Asian, Arab, Latinx, African, and other political theological traditions have sought to map out reconfigurations of sacred/profane bodies politic amidst and from scenes of empire, colonialisms, decolonization, and postcolonial nationalisms. What we hope the contributions to this special issue will share, then, is not a singular political theological tradition, nor an exclusive set of geographical coordinates, nor a unitary understanding of the queer, but a sustained attention to the spiritual, psychical, religious, political, and ontological torsion at the core of processes of subject formation.

Possible topics might include:

  •   Religious praxis, ritual, and the sacred in sexual cultures
  •   Queer bare life, queer creaturely life, queer flesh, queer sacrifice
  •   The melancholic place of political theology in queer theory, queer theology and religious studies
  •   The queer temporalities and spatialities of political theology
  •   Queer secularisms
  •   Queer theory and forms of theism and atheism
  •   Queer theology’s responses to ecology and the Anthropocene
  •   The end(s) of history and queer readings of eschatology
  •   Queer poetics of theological texts and religious traditions

    We are looking for abstracts (no longer than 500 words) for contributions to be considered for inclusion in this issue. Please also include a one-page CV. Please send any inquiries and submissions to glqqpt@gmail.com by Friday, February 1, 2019.

    GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies is a Duke University Press publication http://www.dukeupress.edu/glq

CfP: CSWIP2019: Feminism & Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Call for Papers: “Beauvoir in Conversation,” a Special Issue of Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Call for Papers – Special Issue of SdBS

“Beauvoir in Conversation”

 

Simone de Beauvoir Studies is currently accepting submissions for its Fall Issue 2019 (Vol. 30, Issue 2), which will be oriented around the theme “Beauvoir in Conversation.” There are at least three relevant senses ofconversation at play in the essays featured in this special issue. First, it implicates engagement with those thinkers who were Beauvoir’s interlocutors in life or on the page, as well as those conversations that are waiting to happen with thinkers whose ideas and writings speak to Beauvoir’s in some regard. Second, the word invites new disciplinary and interdisciplinary engagements with Beauvoir’s oeuvre, including those that place her ideas in relation to fields such as anthropology, geography, religion, critical race theory, and transgender studies. Third, “Beauvoir in Conversation” explores how Beauvoir is talked about¾how her texts and ideas have been received historically, how her sex has influenced how she is heard, and the extent to which her influence extends into popular culture, art, and the spirit of people today. Articles are published in English or French. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis, but to guarantee consideration for publication in this special issue (Vol. 30, Issue 2) submissions must be received by March 1, 2019. To submit an article, please refer to Instructions for Authors and additional information found on the journal’s website: www.brill.com/sdbs.

CfP: Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle, Stonehill College

The Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle

Stonehill College

North Easton, MA

April 5-7, 2019

We seek submissions for papers on any aspect of Foucault’s work, as well as studies, critiques, and applications of Foucauldian thinking.

Paper submissions require an abstract of no more than 750 words. All submissions should be formatted as a “.doc” or “.docx” attachment, prepared for anonymous review, and sent via email to the attention of program committee chair Don Deere (dtdeere@gmail.com) on or before December 14, 2018Indicate “Foucault Circle submission” in the subject heading. Program decisions will be announced during the week of January 15, 2019.

In light of the recent publication of Les Aveux de la chair (The History of Sexuality IV), this year’s meeting will include a discussion session on Foucault’s complex engagement with Christianity (relevant English texts will be made available on our website).  The conference will begin with a Friday afternoon panel session and an evening reception.  Morning and afternoon paper sessions will be held on Saturday, followed by a business meeting and dinner. The conference will conclude with paper sessions on Sunday morning. Presenters will have approximately 40 minutes for paper presentation and discussion combined; papers should be a maximum of 3500 words (20-25 minutes reading time).

 

Logistical information about lodging, transportation, and other arrangements will be available after the program has been announced.

For more information about the Foucault Circle, please see our website: http://www.foucaultcircle.org

or contact our Coordinator, Ed McGushin: emcgushin@stonehill.edu

CfP: “Gender, Sexuality, and Judaism,” G’vanim, the Journal of the Academy for Jewish Religion

In the last few years issues of gender and sexuality have risen to the forefront of public attention. As such, AJR devotes our next volume of G’vavnim to the topic of “Gender, Sexuality, and Judaism.” Contributions may consider the topic from any historical period and from any rigorous methodology (both traditional and academic). To be considered for publication in this volume, abstracts for articles must be received by November 30, 2018. If approved, complete articles of 1500-5000 words in length will be due March 1, 2019. Authors are invited to submit abstracts of 250-500 words for potential articles to the current editor, Dr. Matthew Goldstone (mgoldstone@ajrsem.org) for review.

Submission Guidelines

G’vanim is an online journal published annually by the Academy for Jewish Religion (and indexed by EBSCO Publishing). G’vanim commissions and reviews unsolicited submissions for articles on topics related to the past, present, and future of Judaism. Articles that contribute to the Academy for Jewish Religion’s dedication to pluralism are especially welcome. Articles should not have been published previously and, while authors retain the rights to their contributions, acceptance for publication in G’vanim constitutes agreement not to republish submissions elsewhere for one year following the official date of publication of the relevant volume of G’vanim. Although G’vnaim is not officially a peer-review journal, all abstracts and full-length articles must be approved by the editor and/or editorial board as meeting the high standards for excellence in research and novelty of contribution prior to acceptance for publication.

About the Journal

Founded in 1956, the Academy for Jewish Religion (AJR) is the oldest pluralistic Jewish seminary in the United States. AJR is dedicated to ordaining rabbis and cantors for all Jewish communities and to sharing insights into Judaism and Jewish tradition with our expanded community. Accordingly, in 2005 faculty member Rabbi Bernard M. Zlotowitz (1925-2015) issued our first volume of G’vanim: The Journal of the Academy for Jewish Religion to “spread and disseminate more Jewish knowledge.” After publishing 9 volumes, publication of the journal was temporarily suspended while AJR devoted efforts to the publication of Studies in Judaism and Pluralism: Honoring the 60th Anniversary of the Academy for Jewish Religion, edited by adjunct faculty member Dr. Leonard Levin. It is with great excitement that we revive the journal as an online publication in order to fulfill our mission of serving the Jewish community and providing knowledge of Jews and Judaism to the general community.

CFP: 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, “Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and ‘Natural’ Worlds”

Call for Papers: the 18th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The theme for the 2020 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities will be Gendered Environments: Exploring Histories of Women, Genders, and Sexualities in Social, Political, and “Natural” Worlds. The conference will be held May 21-23, 2020 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The 2020 “Big Berks” focuses on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, and this year devotes special attention to a pressing theme of our current moment: the role of environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems broadly defined in the histories of women, genders, and sexualities. As we plan our meeting at the edge of the Chesapeake Bay, a profoundly vibrant ecosystem where humans have gathered for millennia, we are reminded of the many ways in which the natural world has shaped human society. Its history also highlights the local and global connections of all places. This place is the homeland of the Piscataway Conoy Tribe, and was home to Henrietta Lacks; it is the site of the Baltimore Fish market and a part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, a node in the Atlantic Flyway, and at the edge of the Atlantic World.

Our aim is to hold conversations that think through the intricate interplays among gender and sexuality, social and legal systems of power and political representation, and the material realities of an interconnected world continually shaped by physical nature, the human and nonhuman animals, plants, and other beings that inhabit that nature. If Earth’s history has indeed entered a new geological epoch termed the Anthropocene, where do the historical knowledges and experiences of women, people of diverse genders and sexualities, and people of color, along with environmental justice efforts in the historical past, enter into our efforts to understand, theorize, contextualize, and meet these existential problems?

While the notion of environments invokes important thinking about Earth, our theme extends to a capacious definition of social, cultural, and political surrounds. The histories of women’s lives, intellectualism, and activism unfold across a range of environmental contexts that are simultaneously material, political, economic, and cultural. We interpret this overarching theme broadly, inviting submissions for an array of engaging and interactive presentations intended to generate conversations across time, fields, methodologies, and geographic borders; across races, classes, sexualities and gender identities; among academic and public historians, activists, artists and performers. We are especially keen to attract participants from around the globe and scholars of time periods and geographic fields that typically have been underrepresented at the Berkshire Conference.

We hope these conversations will highlight fresh perspectives and create new networks for intellectual collaboration and activism among scholars, public historians, artists, activists, teachers, and those interested in history, the environment, climate change, social movements, and social justice. Such interaction has dynamic potential to move the history of women, genders, and sexualities in particularly innovative directions that generate new theories and methodologies, bringing these histories into new spaces – not only in our universities and liberal arts colleges but also in community colleges, neighborhood centers, K-12 schools, prisons, NGOs and other activist groups in the United States and abroad. Such an approach is critical as we are experiencing the effects of pressing environmental issues, even as the value of research from climate science to the humanities is being questioned.

Reviving connections between communities and institutions, historians are increasingly joining forces — inside and outside the academy – with an eye toward affecting social change and social justice. New forms of cooperation have raised important historical questions: What can we learn from internationalizing the discussion of women, communities, and the environment? How can we use multi-sited histories of human and non-human animals as well as the relationships of communities to local and distant ecologies to rewrite gendered histories from long distance trade and exchange to the rise of global capitalism? How can scholars and activists collaborate to transform the pedagogical landscape in our ‘classrooms’ around environmental issues in the past and present? This conference is a call for collaboration and cooperation across many lines of difference.

The 2020 Berkshire Conference will be a venue for difficult conversations about these and other crucial questions. In the hope of promoting a greater range of conversations and interactions, this “Big Berks” seeks to intentionally diversify the way we present and discuss history. In addition to traditional modes of presentation, we encourage the submission of conference presentations that feature different kinds of voices. We strongly encourage submissions that include scholars, public historians and/or activists, artists, and/or performers. We also encourage submissions that include multiple styles – such as digital technologies, formal papers, performance, and/or the arts – along with varied formats from e-posters, pop-up talks to lightning sessions. We invite submissions broadly themed on the histories of women, genders, and sexualities, including but not limited to those with a special interest in environment(s), ecologies, and natural systems.

The deadline for proposals is Sunday, March 17, 2019.  To submit a proposal, visit: https://berks.confex.com/berks/berks20/cfp.cgi