Feminist Summer Reading School 2019: Philosophy and Bodies

From https://femsummer.weebly.com/:

We are excited to announce the third annual Feminist Summer Reading School, hosted this year by Cornell University. The 2019 Summer School theme is “Philosophy and Bodies”, and will be held June 17-22, 2019. Spanning from early understandings of mind-body relations to current ethical and political issues surrounding the body, the Summer Reading School will delve into topics such as disability, gender, weight/fatness, sex, confinement/imprisonment, race, and so on. The Summer School is uniquely structured insofar as all the reading is done at the Summer School and not beforehand, as is customary for conferences. Students disperse to read either in small groups or individually and then reconvene for a discussion session. The Summer School strives to create a collaborative and diverse environment that facilitates meaningful learning among students with varying philosophical strengths and life experiences. In addition, we have invited several scholars to give workshops and lectures on a topic related to feminism and the body.

Confirmed speakers
Dr. Kate Manne, Cornell University

When: June 17-22, 2019
Where: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
Cost: Free
Applications open: January 3
Application Deadline: February 22
Application Decisions: mid-March 

To apply, please send a motivation letter in PDF form to ​femsummer2019@gmail.com. It should be no longer than two pages.

The motivation letter should include your name, contact information, and institutions you have or currently attend. It should answer the three following questions:

1. What are your philosophical interests, aspirations, and background?
2. What motivates your application to the Feminist Summer Reading School?
3. What interests you about feminist philosophy? What interests you about “the body” or “bodies” in philosophy?

We especially encourage students from underrepresented or marginalized  groups to apply. We therefore encourage you to let us know, in your motivation letter, what underrepresented or marginalized groups you belong to, and and how they have affected your academic experience.

For more information, visit https://femsummer.weebly.com/

If further information is required, contact femsummer2019@gmail.com

Call for Abstracts: Binational Conference on Ethics, Politics, and Migration at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Call for Abstracts

Binational Conference: Ethics, Politics and Migration at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Ciudad Juárez, México and El Paso, Texas

Dates: May 15-17, 2019
Locations: Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ) and the University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP)
Languages: Spanish, English and Portuguese
Confirmed Speakers: Eduardo Mendieta (Penn State), Melissa W. Wright (Penn State) Tony Payan (UACJ), Amy Reed-Sandoval (UTEP)
Sponsors: Doctoral Program in Philosophy (UACJ) Master Program in Social Work Program (UACJ), Department of Philosophy (UTEP)

Overview: 
The unequal and exclusionary processes of globalization that began decades ago have had devastating effects on a high percentage of the world’s population, many of whom have been compelled to migrate in search of enhanced security and life opportunities. In a clear double standard, we have witnessed “open borders” for capital as state borders have contributed to migratory crises such as those experienced in Europe in recent years, as well as those of Latin America and the United States.

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas flank the U.S.-Mexico border and constitute the largest binational zone in the world, making this a natural setting in which to hold this conference on ethics, politics and migration. This conference seeks to initiate a “North-South Dialogue” on immigration justice while centering both Latin American philosophy and Latin American perspectives on the ethics of borders. Our aim is to highlight feature the perspectives of academics, immigrant rights activists and migrants on a range of ethical challenges.

To increase our impact, a conference blog will be generated to highlight key elements of all the conference presentations. In addition, all conference papers will be considered for inclusion in a volume dedicated to the conference them which will be edited by Luis Rubén Díaz Cepeda and Amy Reed-Sandoval.

Possible topics for abstracts and papers include (but are not limited to):
·       The ethics of immigrant admissions to Global South countries, including (but not limited to) Mexico and other Latin American countries
·       The obligations of the Mexican state toward Central American migrants in its territory
·       Methodological Nationalism (and its possible limitations)
·       The rights of undocumented migrants
·       The relationship between race, gender, class and immigration justice
·       Decolonial perspectives on immigration ethics
·       Ethical challenges presented by the border wall dividing the United States and Mexico (as well as other state border walls and barriers)
·       Family separations, and the particular rights of child migrants
·       The relationship between Latin American philosophy and immigration justice
·       New directions for north-south dialogue on immigration justice
·       The ethical obligations of non-state actors with regard to immigration justice

Submission of Abstracts
Send abstracts (400 words max.) prepared for anonymous review to emigracion2019@gmail.com . Please also include a separate word document that lists the following: author name, title, academic or organizational affiliation, and state or country of current residence.

Important Dates:
Deadline for submission of abstracts: March 15th, 2019
Notification of acceptance: March 31st, 2019
Conference: May 15th-17th, 2019

Costs of participation:
500 pesos Mexican nationals
50 USD foreign nationals
Exemption for professors and students of UACJ and UTEP

For further information, contact Luis Rubén Díaz Cepeda and Elsa Patricia Hernández Conference Organizers at:  emigracion2019@gmail.com) or visit
https://www.facebook.com/emigracion2019/

Dissertation Completion Fellowship at Haverford College: Gender & Sexuality Studies with Focus in Visual Studies

The John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College invites applications for a one-year Dissertation Completion Fellowship to begin Fall 2019 in gender and sexuality studies with a focus in visual studies.

We are particularly interested in candidates whose research and teaching interests engage other programs at the College, including Africana Studies, Health Studies, and Peace, Justice, and Human Rights. The successful candidate will teach a one/one course load: one advanced course in their research area and a second course at the introductory level. The fellowship comes with a competitive salary, health benefits, and funds for research and travel.

Applicants are asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, two course proposals (one page max), a one-page timeline outlining how the applicant plans to complete the written portion of the dissertation by June 30, 2020, a writing sample of no more than 25 pages, and two confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the applicant’s dissertation advisor attesting to the applicant’s ability to complete the dissertation on schedule, submitted via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/58658 no later than February 15, 2019.

Questions can be directed to Ken Koltun-Fromm (kkoltunf [at] haverford.edu)

John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities

Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041

Visit: https://www.haverford.edu/provost/news/dissertation-completion-fellowship-haverford-college-2019-2020

Call for Papers: Queer Political Theologies Special Issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies

Edited by Ricky Varghese (Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis), David K. Seitz (Harvey Mudd

College), and Fan Wu (University of Toronto)

The contested field of political theology asks after the seemingly persistent theological, religious, and metaphysical character of people’s affective investments in political institutions and forms of life, including putatively secular ones. Political theology attends to what remains, what lingers— perhaps transfigured or rescaled—at scenes of crisis, catastrophe, and change, in moments when forms of life undergo profound structural and spiritual transformation. This special issue emerges from our observation that political theology, queer theory, religious studies, and queer theology already share in a critical hesitation about the pretensions of the modern subject as secular, sovereign, disillusioned, and bereft of metaphysical attachments; and in a curiosity about the psychic, visceral, ontological, and affective character of subject formation. Our aim, then, is not merely to “queer” political theology—to make a set of queerly informed postulates out of theology—but also to ask what is already queer about the intersections and junctures of the political and the theological.

We invite work that shares our curiosity about how the queer as an ontological, ethico-political, historical, and materialist category worthy of exploration might in itself emerge from the meeting of the political and the theological. We welcome scholarship that approaches the political and the theological themselves as categories that are deeply invested in configurations of modernity, subjectivity, and ontology—work that asks after the queerness that inheres or festers in the relationships between modernity, subjectivity, and ontology, broadly conceived. Queer political theologies might investigate scenes of jointure and investiture between otherwise inchoate, abject, quivering, creaturely, or fleshy bodies and sacralising political orders or religious praxes that imbue them with significance.

We approach this work with a keen awareness of the fraught stakes of gathering together scholarship from multiple fields and trajectories (queer theory, political theology, queer theology, religious studies, and more) under the banner of “queer political theology” in particular. Indeed, distinct scholarly traditions, not all of them historically friendly to emancipatory ethical, political, and intellectual aims, have infected “political theology” quite differently. While European(ist) political theologies have focused on the psychical and spiritual consequences of the shift from monarchical sovereignty to biopolitical forms of popular sovereignty, Asian, Arab, Latinx, African, and other political theological traditions have sought to map out reconfigurations of sacred/profane bodies politic amidst and from scenes of empire, colonialisms, decolonization, and postcolonial nationalisms. What we hope the contributions to this special issue will share, then, is not a singular political theological tradition, nor an exclusive set of geographical coordinates, nor a unitary understanding of the queer, but a sustained attention to the spiritual, psychical, religious, political, and ontological torsion at the core of processes of subject formation.

Possible topics might include:

  •   Religious praxis, ritual, and the sacred in sexual cultures
  •   Queer bare life, queer creaturely life, queer flesh, queer sacrifice
  •   The melancholic place of political theology in queer theory, queer theology and religious studies
  •   The queer temporalities and spatialities of political theology
  •   Queer secularisms
  •   Queer theory and forms of theism and atheism
  •   Queer theology’s responses to ecology and the Anthropocene
  •   The end(s) of history and queer readings of eschatology
  •   Queer poetics of theological texts and religious traditions

    We are looking for abstracts (no longer than 500 words) for contributions to be considered for inclusion in this issue. Please also include a one-page CV. Please send any inquiries and submissions to glqqpt@gmail.com by Friday, February 1, 2019.

    GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies is a Duke University Press publication http://www.dukeupress.edu/glq

CfP: CSWIP2019: Feminism & Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Call for Papers: “Beauvoir in Conversation,” a Special Issue of Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Call for Papers – Special Issue of SdBS

“Beauvoir in Conversation”

 

Simone de Beauvoir Studies is currently accepting submissions for its Fall Issue 2019 (Vol. 30, Issue 2), which will be oriented around the theme “Beauvoir in Conversation.” There are at least three relevant senses ofconversation at play in the essays featured in this special issue. First, it implicates engagement with those thinkers who were Beauvoir’s interlocutors in life or on the page, as well as those conversations that are waiting to happen with thinkers whose ideas and writings speak to Beauvoir’s in some regard. Second, the word invites new disciplinary and interdisciplinary engagements with Beauvoir’s oeuvre, including those that place her ideas in relation to fields such as anthropology, geography, religion, critical race theory, and transgender studies. Third, “Beauvoir in Conversation” explores how Beauvoir is talked about¾how her texts and ideas have been received historically, how her sex has influenced how she is heard, and the extent to which her influence extends into popular culture, art, and the spirit of people today. Articles are published in English or French. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis, but to guarantee consideration for publication in this special issue (Vol. 30, Issue 2) submissions must be received by March 1, 2019. To submit an article, please refer to Instructions for Authors and additional information found on the journal’s website: www.brill.com/sdbs.

CfP: Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle, Stonehill College

The Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Foucault Circle

Stonehill College

North Easton, MA

April 5-7, 2019

We seek submissions for papers on any aspect of Foucault’s work, as well as studies, critiques, and applications of Foucauldian thinking.

Paper submissions require an abstract of no more than 750 words. All submissions should be formatted as a “.doc” or “.docx” attachment, prepared for anonymous review, and sent via email to the attention of program committee chair Don Deere (dtdeere@gmail.com) on or before December 14, 2018Indicate “Foucault Circle submission” in the subject heading. Program decisions will be announced during the week of January 15, 2019.

In light of the recent publication of Les Aveux de la chair (The History of Sexuality IV), this year’s meeting will include a discussion session on Foucault’s complex engagement with Christianity (relevant English texts will be made available on our website).  The conference will begin with a Friday afternoon panel session and an evening reception.  Morning and afternoon paper sessions will be held on Saturday, followed by a business meeting and dinner. The conference will conclude with paper sessions on Sunday morning. Presenters will have approximately 40 minutes for paper presentation and discussion combined; papers should be a maximum of 3500 words (20-25 minutes reading time).

 

Logistical information about lodging, transportation, and other arrangements will be available after the program has been announced.

For more information about the Foucault Circle, please see our website: http://www.foucaultcircle.org

or contact our Coordinator, Ed McGushin: emcgushin@stonehill.edu