Call for Applicants: Book Review Editor for Body and Religion

We are seeking applicants for the role of Book Review Editor for the journal, Body and Religion, published since 2017 by Equinox. Two issues a year are published with approximately 4-6 book reviews each. Reviews should be 1000-2000 words in length and refrain from notes. They are published “open access” on the Equinox site. The book review editor is responsible for maintaining a list of newly published books relevant to our readership, soliciting and maintaining communication with reviewers, editing reviews, and serving as a liaison between the press and the journal to ask for review copies to be mailed to reviewers and sending follow up copies of reviews once published to the marketing division of publication houses. Coordination between the editorial team, board members and Equinox is expected.

 

This important opportunity to shape scholarly discourse about religious embodiment is open to all tenure-track and independent scholarly ranks. We are seeking an applicant to serve at minimum for 2-3 years with clear communication skills, editing expertise, and organizational capacities for maintaining logistics around review cycles between editors and reviewers. Applicant should be familiar with the field of body and religion in order to know whom to contact about writing book reviews. They may also be asked to review regular article submissions in alignment with their expertise.

 

The book review editor receives a free subscription to the journal and an Equinox author discount of 35% on other titles. Their affiliated university library would also receive an institutional discount for their subscription to the journal. While most books are sent directly to reviewers from the press, postage costs for books sent by the editor are covered by Equinox.

 

All interested applicants may send a letter of interest and C.V. to Dr. Katherine Zubko, Editor of Body and Religion, by July 30, 2019. Position will remain open until filled. Please direct any inquiries to Dr. Zubko at kzubko@unca.edu. More information about the journal may be found below.

 

Body and Religion is an internationally peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal devoted to all issues of body and religion. We welcome English-language submissions from scholars who use diverse methodologies and approaches, ranging from traditional to innovative, to explore issues of “body” as a fundamental analytical category in the study of religion. We seek to publish the widest possible diversity of critical inquiry into the relationships between all manner of bodies; concepts of “body,” and both traditional and alternative religious traditions, popular culture, literature, the arts, psychology, philosophy, the natural sciences, national and social movements, gender and sexuality, modification and transformation, underground/alternative culture, time periods, and regions.

The journal provides a forum for the study of all manner of ancient and contemporary practices, concerns, ideals, and connections or disconnections between body and religion. Essays and analyses are capable of being delivered on a multi-media platform, assisting in examining performances, rituals, and other topics that are not easily captured in print. However, alternate and innovative presentations must include a significant written portion for print, while corresponding extra color art, video, and other media will be included on the journal website and in other electronic forms.

Body and Religion considers submissions from both established scholars and research students. All articles are refereed.

 

Call for Papers: 2019 Feminist Theologies Conference: Power, Authority, Love

2019 Feminist Theologies Conference

Friday October 11 – Saturday October 12, 2019

Pilgrim Theological College, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Confirmed plenary presentations:

  • Reverend Dr Seforosa Caroll (Sydney),
  • Reverend Dr Sally Douglas (Melbourne),
  • Dr Janice McRandal (Brisbane).
  • Professor Nicola Slee (Birmingham and Amsterdam),
  • Janette Gray RSM Lecture by Nicola Slee at 7.30pm on Friday 11 October

Call for Papers

Power, Authority, Love: Writing, Rites, and Right

We warmly invite scholars, activists, artists and other practitioners to explore and expound feminist understandings of power, authority and love, both as distinct concepts or experiences and in the interrelatedness. The scope of papers is broad. Diverse contributions will, however, be connected through one of three lenses:

  1. “writing”—focusing on engagement with feminist theological work on power, authority or love;
  2. “rites”—focusing on ritual expressions of power, authority or love informed by feminist theology;
  3. “right”—focusing on getting power, authority or love “right” in practice from feminist perspective.

Presentations of 20 minutes (only and firmly) will be followed by 15 minutes discussion.

How to submit a paper

Proposals of 250 words are due by July 7, 2019, to tfraser (at) divinity.edu.au

Please include your name, academic or other relevant affiliation, paper title, and a statement of how the proposal is related to the conference theme.

Acceptance will be advised by 29 July 2019.

Selected papers will be published after peer review in a special issue of a journal and/or a collection of essays arising from the event.

Visit: https://vox.divinity.edu.au/news/call-for-papers-power-authority-love/?fbclid=IwAR0NGIR7e9VyVzuoOsIDlc8I3jNAka3J7rWSLj9xBlWO-KFtoldDC_vXLwY

Call for Essays: Religion and (Proto)Feminism in Early Modern Women’s Lives and Works, 1500-1800

Call for Papers

There is a tendency among some contemporary feminists to place religion (especially monotheistic religion) and feminism on opposite ends of the ideological spectrum — as belief systems and sets of practices that contend with and / or threaten each other. Feminist activist Gloria Steinem gave voice to such a perspective in an answer to an interview question about what she wished she had been more responsive to over the years. She professed, “What I should have been more in an uproar about is monotheism and religion…I mean, religion is, too often, politics you’re not supposed to talk about,” though she clarifies she is open to the more “democratic” category of “spirituality.” The “feminist and trade union activist” Cath Elliott is more explicit about her belief that religion is hostile to the feminist cause, “Christianity is and always has been antithetical to women’s freedom and equality, but it’s certainly not alone in this. Whether it’s one of the world’s major faiths or an off-the-wall cult, religion means one thing and one thing only for those women unfortunate enough to get caught up in it: oppression. It’s the patriarchy made manifest, male-dominated, set up by men to protect and perpetuate their power.”

In this interdisciplinary collection, we wish to evaluate, from a historical perspective, the statements made by Steinem and Elliott (among others) on the relationship between religion and (proto) feminism, particularly Elliott’s claim that “Christianity is and always has been antithetical to women’s freedom and equality.” We will accomplish this end by closely analyzing the lives and works of women creating cultural artifacts in Britain and the Americas between 1500 and 1800 — that is between the Renaissance and the inception of the Romantic period. Essays that take into account the intersectionality of women’s identities and works in this historical span are particularly welcome.

In writing their essays, contributors will be expected to pay close attention to the material culture in which women lived and produced a range of works (poetry, plays, prose, drawings, paintings, sculpture, musical compositions, etc.). They will also be asked to draw on the growing body of scholarship on feminism and religion that complicates or troubles (but does not necessarily disprove) the view that feminism and religion are antithetical forces.

300-500-word proposals, along with a CV, should be submitted by e-mail to Dr. Holly Faith Nelson, Professor and Chair of English and Co-Director of the Gender Studies Institute, Trinity Western University, on or before 30 September 2019.

Strong interest in the collection has been expressed by a university press for the series on Early Modern Feminisms.

Contact Info:

Dr. Holly Faith Nelson, Department of English and Creative Writing, Trinity Western University

Contact Email:
holly.nelson (at) twu.ca

Call for Applications: Theology as Interdisciplinary Inquiry, A Writing Workshop for Early Career Scholars

March 2 – April 8, 2020

The Center of Theological Inquiry published Theology as Interdisciplinary Inquiry: Learning with the Natural and Human Sciences in 2017. This volume distills the insights of three interdisciplinary inquiries at CTI in dialogue with anthropology, psychology, and law. Building on this project, the Center welcomes applications from early career scholars—doctoral, post-doctoral, and pre-tenure— who address the methodological question of theology as interdisciplinary inquiry in their own current research.

Applicants must submit a draft thesis/book chapter or a draft article for a peer-reviewed journal on any interdisciplinary theological topic which they would revise as work-in-progress during this full time, intensive writing workshop over six weeks in Princeton. Members of the Writing Workshop work daily in adjacent offices at the Center’s Luce Hall, Monday to Thursday. They present their work in progress in weekly seminars and enjoy daily lunches with the CTI research community. The Center provides furnished housing for workshop members, who must cover all other living costs, including travel.

To apply online by the deadline of May 31, 2019 go to ctinquiry.org/Apply

Questions to apply(at)ctinquiry.org

The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty 2019

Call for Applicants: The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty 2019.

The American Studies Association’s Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies calls for submissions to the seventh annual Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award for Independent Scholars, Contingent or Community College Faculty. This award honors Anzaldúa’s outstanding career as an independent scholar and her labor as contingent faculty, along with her groundbreaking contributions to scholarship to feminist, women of color and queer theory. The award includes a lifetime membership in the ASA, a lifetime electronic subscription to American Quarterly, and $500. Applicants must work in American studies or a related field and work as independent scholars and/or as faculty at community colleges or in a contingent capacity (i.e., as part-time or full-time non-ladder-rank or non-tenure-track instructors, adjuncts, or lecturers). Graduate students are ineligible.

Applicants must submit the following: a cover letter (two pages maximum), a two-page vita; and an essay/paper which does not exceed 25 pages, including end notes and bibliography, and which fulfills one of the following criteria: unpublished, accepted for publication, or published in 2017 or 2018. Relevant submissions will demonstrate an affinity with Anzaldua’s oeuvre, vision, or political commitments and should address connections among some or all the following categories: race, ethnicity, citizenship, class, gender, sexuality, and dis/ability. Please address this affinity in your cover letter.

Please submit your application electronically by MAY 15, 2019, to the committee co-chair, Samantha Pinto (asagenderandsexuality (at) gmail.com). Late submissions will not be accepted. The winner will be contacted regarding arrangements to attend the annual meeting of the association to be held November 7-10, 2019 in Honolulu, Hawai’i, where they will be announced as the awardee at the Generational Gifts Brunch (cosponsored by the Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies, the Critical Ethnic Studies Committee, the Minority Scholars Committee, and the Students Committee).

Visit: https://www.theasa.net/awards/committee-caucus-awards-prizes/gloria-e-anzaldúa-award

CfP: Feminism and Classics 2020, “body/language”

FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy.  The conference theme is “body/language,” broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related fields are welcome.
This conference focuses on the use of the body and/or language to gain, lose, contest, or express power and agency in the ancient Mediterranean world.  Bodies and words, at both the physical and the conceptual levels, can exert disproportionate, oppositional, or complementary forces.  Both have the power to transform their surrounding environments significantly.  Yet there is a problematic dichotomy between body/physicality and language/reason, a problem long noted by philosophers, literary theorists, and social historians.  FemClas 2020 seeks to contest, blur, and even eradicate these boundaries through papers, panels, and other programming that promotes interdisciplinary exploration of the ancient world.
We invite contributions that use the lens of bodies, languages, or their intersections to address any aspect of the ancient world, modern encounters with ancient cultures, or the academic practices of Classics, Philosophy, and related fields.  Participants might explore how voices engender movement(s) and transform bodies, or how movement(s) in turn can stimulate recognition of unheard or otherwise suppressed voices and lead to change.  These can be voices and movements within the ancient world, within the university, or within our modern disciplines.  The study of agency, expressed through the problematic body/language dichotomy, addresses critical questions not only in scholarly work but also in the governance, makeup, and power dynamics of our fields, currently and historically.  Now, perhaps more than ever, is a critical time for us to consider ourselves as students of bodies past and present, as embodied scholars, and to interrogate the repercussions of body normativity — from race and gender to neurodiversity, dis/ability, and body types — on our work and our profession.
All submissions are due September 1, 2019.  FemClas 2020 welcomes individual papers, organized panels, workshops, roundtables, posters, author-meets-critic sessions, and other, innovative forms of programming.  We encourage submissions from the widest possible range of perspectives, addressing all areas of the ancient world and its legacies.  We also welcome proposals especially from related interest groups (such as Mountaintop, Eos Africana, the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus, MRECC, Classics & Social Justice, the Lambda Classical Caucus, the Women’s Classical Caucus, and EuGeSta) and from allied disciplines (e.g., English, comparative literature, media studies, environmental humanities, animal studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).
Proposals should aim for an abstract of approximately 300 words (not counting works cited), and should be anonymous where possible.  To submit a proposal for an individual paper or poster, visit:
To submit a proposal for any other type of session, visit:
We are enthusiastic about developing a program that will work toward making our intellectual community more welcoming and accessible to all. For this reason, we invite with special emphasis proposals for workshops, roundtables, and the like (creative formats welcome!) that will offer practical training about e.g. implicit bias, sexual harassment, racism, accessibility, developing diversity statements, and so forth.
The organizers (T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Emily Austin) and the Program Committee of FemClas 2020 are committed to an inclusive, welcoming, and accommodating conference.  Submissions from graduate students, contingent and underemployed faculty, and independent scholars are especially welcome.  Submissions from undergraduate students are also welcome and will be considered separately for a dedicated panel.  We will be able to provide reduced conference fees and some travel assistance for attendance by participants who cannot obtain institutional support.
As part of submission, registration, and attendance at the conference, we will ask you to agree to our conference Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy, which prohibits harassment and discrimination of any kind.  A trained, experienced Anti-Harassment Administrator who is not a member of the discipline will receive and address or refer complaints about harassment and violations of the code of conduct.  The Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy is available here:
FemClas 2020 will take place partially on the downtown campus of Wake Forest University and partially at a nearby hotel.  Each site is fully accessible for all forms of mobility.  At each site there will be all-gender bathrooms, a lactation room, a quiet room, and on-site childcare (which we hope to offer at no extra cost).
Some states prohibit using state funds to travel to North Carolina, despite the partial repeal of NC HB-2.  Wake Forest University, as a private institution, is not subject to NC state legislative regulations of public universities, and Wake Forest has a non-discrimination policy inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression:
Please contact T. H. M. Gellar-Goad at thmgg@wfu.edu with questions.

Job Posting: Research Fellow/Senior Research Fellow, Medieval & Early Modern Studies (Australian Catholic University’s Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry)

The Australian Catholic University is seeking researchers of outstanding potential and demonstrated achievement with expertise in medieval and early modern studies to join its recently established research program within ACU’s Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry.

The work of applicants should encompass religion, broadly conceived, in the medieval and early modern periods. The recent round of appointments established strengths in late medieval and early modern Italy and the Low Countries, late medieval and early modern Central Europe, early modern France, the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman world, and the history of the papacy; the cultures of time, religious violence, theology and literature, women’s spirituality, popular religion, politics, and theology.

With this further round of appointments, the MEMS Program seeks scholars whose work will complement and expand these strengths. Applicants to the first round are welcome to re-apply.

Successful applicants will join a vibrant research environment and work collegially and collaboratively to build their own research profile of high quality publications and contribute to team projects within their area of specialization and across traditional disciplinary boundaries.

The IRCI is a research institute which promotes collaborative research on religion and critical thought from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including philosophy, theology, history, and literature, thereby contributing to contemporary theological, philosophical, ethical, and political debates. In addition to Seminars and public events held at ICRI’s location at ACU Melbourne, the institute hosts seminars across each year at ACU’s Rome campus, encouraging the fruitful exchange of ideas with leading scholars from around the world.

The University pursues on excellence agenda and offers an environment where staff are welcomed and safe and valued through development, participation and involvement.

Apply by 16 April 2019

https://careers.pageuppeople.com/456/caw/en/job/974909/research-fellowsenior-research-fellow-medieval-early-modern-studies